USA

Monterey Peninsula water district board opposes Cal Am desal project – California

For the first time, the Monterey Peninsula Water Management District has formally expressed opposition to the California American Water desalination project, backing the proposed Pure Water Monterey recycled water project expansion instead as a replacement and not just a backup.

At the same time, the water district took another step toward a potential acquisition of Cal Am’s Monterey water system with the release of a draft environmental impact report on the proposed public buyout effort.

In a split vote, the water district board on Monday approved a letter to Coastal Commission executive director John Ainsworth calling for the commission to deny Cal Am’s desal permit bid, arguing that the Pure Water Monterey expansion is a “feasible alternative” to desal that could produce enough water to meet the Carmel River pumping cutback order based on the district’s own analysis at lower cost and less environmental impact.

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Corpus Christi coalition to host drive-by petition protesting planned desalination plants – Texas

A coalition of seven Corpus Christi groups will host a weekly drive-by public petition against any desalination plant plans in the Coastal Bend. 

The drive-by will be from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturdays at Oleander Point. The group, called, Save the Bay for the Greater Good, is also mailing out more than 25,000 petitions.

The coalition expects enough signatures to require the city of Corpus Christi to hold an election to allow Corpus Christi residents to vote on a charter amendment restricting the city from building desalination plants, according to a coalition news release. 

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Plant Profile: Carlsbad Desalination Plant – California

Located in Carlsbad, California, Claude “Bud” Lewis Carlsbad Desalination Plant is the largest seawater desalination plant in the nation. The plant delivers nearly 50 million gallons of fresh, desalinated water to San Diego County on a daily basis. 

A 30-year water purchase agreement is in place between the San Diego County Water Authority and Poseidon Water, a water project development specialist, for the entire output of the plant.

The plant has delivered water to San Diego County since December 2015 and normally operates with a staff of approximately 40 employees working full time. This has since changed after public health orders announced that no more than 10 people can congregate in one place. 

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Santa Barbara’s Water Outlook Foresees Sufficient Supply to Meet Demands Through Fall 2022 – California

Santa Barbara’s water supplies are on the way to recovery followed by three average or above-average rainy seasons.

The city’s water-supply forecasting shows there’s sufficient supply to meet demands through fall 2022, while allowing groundwater basins to slowly recover and rest, water supply analyst Dakota Corey told the city’s Water Commission at Thursday’s special meeting.

The availability of water from Gibraltar Reservoir, upstream on the Santa Ynez River, in the past few years as well as Santa Barbara’s desalination plant operation and water conservation have enabled the city to accumulate a significant amount of stored water in Lake Cachuma, Corey said.

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The US Demands Israel Takes its Side in the New Cold War with China – America

CTech – In Israel, defense has always been the number one item on the agenda, so when US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo made a rushed visit to Jerusalem at the height of the coronavirus (Covid-19) crisis, most people assumed it had to do with matters of defense or Israel’s recently announced plans to annex the West Bank. But, as opposed to Israel, where defense reigns supreme, for Americans it is always about the money.

Israelis were surprised to find out that the reason Pompeo exited lockdown and took a plane to Israel at this time was to warn Jerusalem against extending its economic cooperation with China.

The warning was particularly meant to address a desalination plant, but that is just the tip of the iceberg. The unusual visit was meant to signal to Israel that the war is already here and it will soon have to pick a side.

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Online-Only Public Comment for Poseidon Desalination Plant Public Hearing Draws Criticism – California

A state regional water board is drawing public criticism in Orange County for holding meetings on a controversial  desalination plant in Huntington Beach, while public participation can only be done virtually amid the coronavirus health crisis.

The Santa Ana Regional Quality Control Board is meeting this morning to hold a public hearing on Poseidon Water’s request for a permit renewal for their facility, which would be built on 12 acres of a power plant and produce 50 million gallons of water per day, according to water district staff.

The project has remained controversial for years over what critics say will be drastic environmental damage and increased water rates. The approval process for Poseidon Water’s proposal has been marked by legal disputes, permit crusades and lobbying campaigns paid for by the company.

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Senate legislation would expand COVID-19 projects with Israel to lessen dependence on China – Israel

The Senate has introduced legislation to enhance partnerships between American and Israeli companies on COVID-19 projects, thus lessening U.S. dependence on China for life-saving medications and treatments.

The bipartisan legislation was introduced on Wednesday as Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, on a whirlwind eight-hour visit to Israel, criticized China while praising Israel.

“You’re a great partner,” Pompeo said in an appearance with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu before their meeting in Jerusalem. “You share your information, unlike some other countries that try and obfuscate and hide information. And we’ll talk about that country, too.”

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Solar driving efficient electrochemical water treatment – California

A study from the University of California, Berkeley has illustrated the potential advantages and challenges of using PV to power electrochemical water treatment.

Researchers analyzed how the use of solar power could increase the competitiveness of electrochemical approaches such as electrocoagulation (EC), capacitive deionization (CDI), electrodialysis (ED) and electrodeionization (EDI).

The four methods examined, according to the scientists, are not as capital-intensive as traditional large-scale water treatment centers, while also being modular, portable and energy efficient. The use of solar could also make smaller electrochemical facilities suitable for desalination of brackish water in remote regions.

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Material shows promise for capacitive desalination – Virginia

This is the claim of Guoliang “Greg” Liu, an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry at Virginia Tech who has conducted extensive research into the design and synthesis of porous carbon fibres. The material is composed of long, fibrous strands of carbon with uniform mesopores of approximately 10nm.

According to Virginia Tech, Liu sees the primary application of his porous carbon fibres in the automotive industry, where similar materials are used as the external shells of some luxury cars. Now, Liu reports capacitive desalination as a new application for this material.

“Because of the high surface area of the porous carbon fibres, we can store a lot of ions,” Liu said in a statement. “Because of the interconnected porous network, the ion movement is very fast inside the pores.”

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US announces $9m prize for solar-powered desalination projects – United States

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has announced a $9 million (£7m) prize for successful desalination projects, in a bid to bolster freshwater supply across the US.

The Solar Desalination Prize is focused on using solar-thermal energy to extract clean water from sources such as subsurface oil, concentrated brine and municipal facilities.

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