USA

Clean water more than a pipe dream – California

Water scarcity is an ongoing problem in Southern California. Six of the last seven years have been drought years, leaving most of the region highly dependent upon imported water.

By using the best technology, sound management practices, public participation, and a balanced approach to human and environmental needs, Sweet-water Authority—known locally as the Authority—provides its customers clean, safe water from local water supplies.

The Authority is a publicly-owned agency that delivers water via 388 miles of pipeline to serve 190,000 people in a 32-square mile service area in Southern San Diego County.

The Authority’s customers were among the first in the region to benefit from a desalination (desal) process designed to treat “brackish,” or saline, groundwater to make it safe for human use.

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County desalination plant celebrates 40 billion gallons of drinking water – San Diego

Representatives from San Diego County and Poseidon Water held a celebration Thursday for the Claude “Bud” Lewis Carlsbad Desalination Plant producing its 40 billionth gallon of drinking water.

The celebration also correlated with the third anniversary of the plant opening. The Carlsbad plant produces more than 50 million gallons of desalinated water each day and is the largest and most technologically advanced desalination plant in the U.S., according to the county.

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Carlsbad Desalination Plant Purifies 40 Billionth Gallon of Ocean Water – Carlsbad

The newest source of drinking water in our county just reached a major milestone.

Around 100 million gallons of seawater are pumped through the filters at the Carlsbad desalination plant every day. Within about three hours that water is purified and sent to the taps.

After three strong years, the plant just produced its 40 billionth gallon of drinking water. That’s enough water to fill a billion bathtubs, or fill every floor of the empire state building, 145 times.

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El Paso to drink treated sewage water due to climate change drought – Texas

The people of El Paso, Texas, are resilient. Living in the middle of the harsh Chihuahuan Desert, the city has no other choice. On average, 15 days every year spike over 100 degrees Fahrenheit.

The city gets little relief with annual rainfall of just about 9 inches. It’s one of the hottest cities in the country.

One of its prime sources of water is the Rio Grande. Typically the river can supply as much as half of the city’s water needs.

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Texas City to Guzzle Drinking Water from Treated Waste – Texas

The city of El Paso, Texas, may soon become the first large city in the US to use treated sewage water for its drinking water needs. 

The amount of snowmelt feeding the Rio Grande has dropped 25% since 1958 and is “critically low,” J. Phillip King, an adviser to the Elephant Butte Irrigation District, told CNN.

The use of treated wastewater will add a significant source of water to the city’s supplies.

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Fluence Secures US$50 Million BOOT Project Financing Facility – Melbourne

MELBOURNE, Australia & NEW YORK–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Fluence Corporation Limited (ASX: FLC) is pleased to announce that it has secured a US $50.0 million non-recourse debt facility for project financing of Build, Own, Operate & Transfer (BOOT) projects.

The facility is provided by a leading US-based sustainable infrastructure investment firm with extensive experience in financing infrastructure and renewable energy projects.

Fluence will have access to this facility on a project-by-project basis for 3 years for BOOT projects around the globe.

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Brown and Caldwell wins DBIA awards; WEFTEC abstract deadline is Dec. 3; Modern Water expands – Atlanta

The Design-Build Institute of America (DBIA) announced the winners of its 2018 National Design-Build Project/Team Awards competition.

Within the water/wastewater category, two Brown and Caldwell-involved projects received accolades: National Excellence Award — RM Clayton Water Reclamation Center Headworks (City of Atlanta Department of Watershed Management) and National Merit Award — Bush Beans Process Water Reclamation Facility (Bush Brothers & Company).

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Will the Doheny desalination plant stay on track? It could depend on the election – California – United States of America

Amid California’s list of contentious desalination proposals, the plant slated for Doheny Beach in Dana Point has had remarkably smooth sailing.

Key environmental groups battling plans in Huntington Beach and El Segundo have largely taken a hands-off approach to the south Orange County project, recognizing Doheny’s innovative environmental technology and dearth of local water options there.

Additionally, a draft countywide analysis earlier this month ranked Doheny well above the Huntington Beach plant proposed by the Poseidon company.

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Desal consultant speaking to Swansea Water District Oct. 15 – Maryland – United State

A consultant from Maryland is expected to arrive to speak to the Swansea Water District Board of Commissioners to discuss the desalination issues on Oct. 15.

Acting Superintendent Jeffrey Sutherland noted that Watek Engineering has extensive background in desalination, including brackish water. In addition another firm AECOM is also being consulted.

The desalination plant had difficulties this summer mostly due to the high salinity at the intake. The reverse osmosis filters were unable to handle the high salinity.

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Why Environmental Groups Are Salty on Corpus Christi’s Pricey Desalination Plan – Corpus Christi – Texas

Having tried little else to save its water supply, Corpus Christi is considering an option that no other Texas city has embraced: seawater desalination. The strategy has long been considered a far-in-the-future option because of its cost, logistical challenges and environmental side effects.

Nonetheless, Corpus is plunging ahead in the hopes of diversifying its water supply, which consists entirely of three shallow surface water lakes that rapidly shrink during droughts.

City officials argue that desalination would provide an uninterruptible supply of water for the city’s growing port and industrial area.

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