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Seawater Desalination: A Solution Water Shortage: AMPAC USA – America

AMPAC USA works in designing and manufacturing some of the best seawater desalination equipment for a variety of operations.

But does that answer all the water woes at once? Lately, one has been hearing nothing but shortages and depleting resources. Countries in Africa, South America, Asia and a few parts of North America are facing a very bad and gruesome problem of the water crisis.

Over a thousand children go every day without a single drop of water, Cape Town and several major cities across the globe came close to Day Zero, California lakes had dried up, farmers’ suicides in India were on the rise due to no rainfall.

(LINK).

Coastal Bend desalination plant closer to reality – Texas

After decades of talk, it looks like desalination is the wave of the future for the city’s water supply; and with time to spare.

The Corpus Christi City Council approved a plan Tuesday which will determine when the city will need to have a alternate water supply. The plan also moves the city forward with plans for a saltwater desalination plant.

If everything goes according to plan, a desal plant could be up-and-running either somewhere along the Corpus Christi Ship Channel, or in San Patricio County’s La Quinta corridor, by the end of 2022.

(LINK).

AquaVenture subsidiary extends Bahamas agreement – Bahamas

An operating segment of Tampa’s AquaVenture Holdings has extended its agreement with a customer in The Bahamas by nine years.

Under the agreement, Seven Seas Water will continue to deliver potable water and wastewater treatment services to the Emerald Bay development in Great Exuma, The Bahamas as well as perform certain equipment upgrade services.

“This is our second contract extension and exemplifies the long-term relationships we seek to develop with our customers. We look forward to continuing to provide high levels of service under this contract for the next decade,” Olaf N. Krohg, CEO of Seven Seas Water said in a statement.

(LINK).

Rising sea threatens South Florida’s drinking water and region’s economy – Florida

You grab the last box, freshly packed with life’s memories. As you drive toward the highway, you pass the ruins of what used to be the city you made a home.

The downtown is now a ghost town. Your company has laid you off because all the offices are being forced to close. You must leave the city that you love. Why? The city that floods almost every day no longer has fresh drinking water.

Unfortunately, this scenario might become a reality for most of South Florida’s residents, who receives their drinking water from one source, the Biscayne Aquifer. The aquifer serves residents in Miami-Dade, Monroe, Broward and Palm Beach counties.

(LINK).

California Focus: Desalination loses more urgency in hyper-wet winter – California

Desalination began to lose its urgency among Californians and their public officials two years ago, after the drought-busting winter of 2016-17, when heavy rain and snow ended dry conditions in most of the state.

The idea of drawing potable water from the sea became even less of a priority this year, when an autumn of record-level fires gave way to one of the state’s wettest winters on record.

(LINK).

Desalination loses more urgency in hyper-wet winter – California

Desalination began to lose its urgency among Californians and their public officials two years ago, after the drought-busting winter of 2016-17, when heavy rain and snow ended dry conditions in most of the state.

The idea of drawing potable water from the sea became even less of a priority this year, when an autumn of record-level fires gave way to one of the state’s wettest winters on record.

Reservoirs are brimming. Instead of desperately seeking new sources of water, Californians were moaning about the billions of excess gallons that washed into the Pacific Ocean and the San Francisco Bay. Depleted aquifers began their path to replenishment, too, with snow levels in the water-producing Sierra Nevada Mountains far above normal.

(LINK).

Thomas D. Elias: Desalination loses more urgency in hyper-wet winter – California

Desalination began to lose its urgency among Californians and their public officials two years ago, after the drought-busting winter of 2016-17, when heavy rain and snow ended dry conditions in most of the state.

The idea of drawing potable water from the sea became even less of a priority this year, when an autumn of record-level fires gave way to one of the state’s wettest winters on record.

(LINK).

MegaDroughts And Desalination — Another Pressing Need For Nuclear Power – California

About 20% of the world’s population has no access to safe drinking water, and this number will increase as the population continues to grow and global freshwater sources continue to decline. The worst-affected areas are the arid and semiarid regions of Asia, the Middle East and North Africa.

UNESCO has reported that the freshwater shortfall worldwide will rise to 500 trillion gallons/yr by 2025. They expect water wars to break out in the near-future. The World Economic Forum says that shortage of fresh water may be the primary global threat in the next decade.

But 500 trillion gallons/year only requires about 1,500 seawater desalination plants like the ones being built in California and Saudi Arabia. At a billion dollars a pop, that’s a lot cheaper than war and starvation.

(LINK).

Corpus Christi desalination plans could soon become less murky – Texas

The city of Corpus Christi has long made known its desire to bring seawater desalination to the area, but where such a facility would be located has remained unknown.

That question is closer to being answered, after council members were presented Tuesday an update on the status of the city’s ongoing efforts to identify alternative water sources.

The city is looking at sites along the La Quinta Channel and the Inner Harbor, but have not identified specific locations for a seawater desalination plant.

(LINK).

As Water Scarcity Increases, Desalination Plants Are on the Rise – California

Some 30 miles north of San Diego, along the Pacific Coast, sits the Claude “Bud” Lewis Carlsbad Desalination Plant, the largest effort to turn salt water into fresh water in North America.

Each day 100 million gallons of seawater are pushed through semi-permeable membranes to create 50 million gallons of water that is piped to municipal users. Carlsbad, which became fully operational in 2015, creates about 10 percent of the fresh water the 3.1 million people in the region use, at about twice the cost of the other main source of water.

Expensive, yes, but vital for the fact that it is local and reliable. “Drought is a recurring condition here in California,” said Jeremy Crutchfield, water resources manager at the San Diego County Water Authority. “We just came out of a five-year drought in 2017. The plant has reduced our reliance on imported supplies, which is challenging at times here in California. So it’s a component for reliability.”

(LINK).

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