United States

The latest on the Desalination Plant in Corpus Christi – Texas

That is because on and off, the Coastal Bend falls into a drought, and as you may recall, this area is in a stage one water restriction.

Following a dangerous drought in 2011, an idea was born to bring a more resilient, reliable, and cost-effective water source to the Coastal Bend.

More specifically, a drought-resistant water supply that could produce up to 20 million gallons of potable water daily.

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Impacts of climate change on our water and energy systems: it’s complicated – California

As the planet continues to warm, the twin challenges of diminishing water supply and growing energy demand are intensifying.

But because water and energy are inextricably linked, as we try to adapt to one challenge – say, by getting more water via desalination or water recycling – we may be worsening the other challenge by choosing energy-intensive processes.

So, in adapting to the consequences of climate change, how can we be sure that we aren’t making problems worse?

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Pure Water Monterey project bolstered by federal grant – California

Under its WaterSMART initiative, which seeks to invest in technologies designed to enable “broader scale use of recycled water to supplement supplies,”.

The federal Bureau of Reclamation awarded the local recycled water project nearly 40% of its $40 million in grants awarded after a competitive review process, according to a release.

The release also noted that the grant funding was “prioritized for projects that develop and supplement urban and irrigation water supplies through water reuse, thereby improving efficiency, providing flexibility during drought or water shortages, and diversifying water supply.”

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Eastern Municipal Water District To Receive $25M In Federal Funds – California

The Eastern Municipal Water District will receive $25 million in federal funds over the next several years to expand its desalination program, increasing fresh water stocks and reducing dependence on water imports, the agency announced Tuesday.

The Perris-based EMWD was selected to receive the additional funding under the recently approved federal Water Resources Development Act, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will be responsible for distributing the funds.

“EMWD is incredibly appreciative of our federal elected officials and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for their partnership and support of our expanding desalination program,” EMWD Board Vice President Phil Paule said.

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Desalination Breakthrough Could Lead to Cheaper Water Filtration – Texas

Producing clean water at a lower cost could be on the horizon after researchers from The University of Texas at Austin and Penn State solved a complex problem that had baffled scientists for decades, until now.

Desalination membranes remove salt and other chemicals from water, a process critical to the health of society, cleaning billions of gallons of water for agriculture, energy production and drinking.

The idea seems simple — push salty water through and clean water comes out the other side — but it contains complex intricacies that scientists are still trying to understand.

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Water restrictions puts spotlight back on desalination plant conversation – Texas

The restrictions are part of the drought contingency plan and are based on the combined capacity lake levels of Lake Corpus Christi and the Choke Canyon Reservoir.

That level has now fallen to below 40-percent.For most of us, the initial part of this plan will affect when we water the lawn.

Corpus Christi’s Mayor Joe McComb said finding an alternative water source could very well help the city avoid future water restrictions during drought conditions.

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Doheny desalination plan met with caution, delays – California

As it enters its 20th year of planning and preparation, a desalination plant proposed near Doheny State Beach continues to be met with delays and uncertainty.

In mid-2018, officials were predicting that the operation could be turning ocean water into drinking water as soon as 2021. Now, the project will be doing well to simply win all required permits by the end of next year.

Additionally, board members of the South Coast Water District have ordered new studies to get a firmer grip on eventual consumer costs and to explore cheaper energy for the power-hungry plant.

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Governor’s talk on environment falls short when it comes to the Poseidon project – California

Orange County sees past Poseidon’s efforts to buy support for its desalination boondoggle. Why can’t Gov. Newsom?

Poseidon Water, a large water development company, has been pushing to build a $1.4-billion water desalination plant in Huntington Beach.

Like Poseidon’s underperforming, high-cost plant in Carlsbad, the plant and its inflated water would be paid for by ratepayers.

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Antioch Desalination Plant: City Takes Out $15M Line Of Credit – California

The Antioch City Council on Tuesday night approved signing a new $15 million line of credit for the construction of a desalination plant to treat brackish water drawn from the San Joaquin River.

Outgoing Mayor Sean Wright said enthusiastically before the unanimous approval, “I want this one.”

The water plant proposal has been in the works since 2016. The agreement with the city’s lender, Bank of the West, will cover construction costs as the $64.6 million project gets underway next year at the location of the existing water treatment plant.

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$15 million credit line will help Antioch build desalination plant – California

Antioch’s plan to build a desalination plant to clear up the city’s brackish water got another boost this week when the City Council unanimously approved $15 million in interim financing.

The almost $70 million project aims to develop a reliable, drought-resistant water supply so the city doesn’t have to depend so much on buying water and can use Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta water year-round.

Antioch’s current water supply, which mainly comes from the river, serves more than 112,000 residents within a 28.8-square-mile area.

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