Texas

The latest on the Desalination Plant in Corpus Christi – Texas

That is because on and off, the Coastal Bend falls into a drought, and as you may recall, this area is in a stage one water restriction.

Following a dangerous drought in 2011, an idea was born to bring a more resilient, reliable, and cost-effective water source to the Coastal Bend.

More specifically, a drought-resistant water supply that could produce up to 20 million gallons of potable water daily.

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Desalination Breakthrough Could Lead to Cheaper Water Filtration – Texas

Producing clean water at a lower cost could be on the horizon after researchers from The University of Texas at Austin and Penn State solved a complex problem that had baffled scientists for decades, until now.

Desalination membranes remove salt and other chemicals from water, a process critical to the health of society, cleaning billions of gallons of water for agriculture, energy production and drinking.

The idea seems simple — push salty water through and clean water comes out the other side — but it contains complex intricacies that scientists are still trying to understand.

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Water restrictions puts spotlight back on desalination plant conversation – Texas

The restrictions are part of the drought contingency plan and are based on the combined capacity lake levels of Lake Corpus Christi and the Choke Canyon Reservoir.

That level has now fallen to below 40-percent.For most of us, the initial part of this plan will affect when we water the lawn.

Corpus Christi’s Mayor Joe McComb said finding an alternative water source could very well help the city avoid future water restrictions during drought conditions.

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Windsor Park Elementary students debate topic of desalination – Texas

It’s a highly debated issue, whether the city of Corpus Christi should construct a multi-million-dollar saltwater desalination plant in the city’s inner harbor.

On Friday, some of our youngest citizens tackled the real-world topic.

They may be third graders, but a group of Windsor Park Elementary students took time to debate the pros and cons of building a desal plant and what it could mean for a future water supply.

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City of Corpus Christi approved for $11.4 million loan to continue seawater desal project – Texas

The City of Corpus Christi is continuing with its $222 million seawater desalination project after being approved for an $11.4 million loan from the Texas Water Development Board.

The $11.4 million loan from the Texas Water Development Board will allow the City of Corpus Christi to do more research about where and how the seawater desalination plant would fit in the Coastal Bend, according to Steve Ramos, Water Resource Manager for the City.

Ramos said by doing more research, when it comes time to present an execution plan, all the kinks are worked out.

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Here’s what desalination plant projects private companies presented to City Council – Texas

The city of Corpus Christi won’t decide how it’s going to build and operate a desalination plant until next year or 2022. 

But during its regular meeting Tuesday, City Council heard from 10 companies that presented their proposals for alternative water sources for Corpus Christi.

Two of the proposals were for ground water projects, two were for wastewater reuse and six were for desalination. 

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McComb: Passage for first loan for Desal Plant will result in ‘no increase’ to your water bill – Texas – United States

On August 25, Corpus Christi City Council members voted to accept a loan from the Texas Water Development Board to execute the next step in building a Seawater Desalination Plant.

Mayor Joe McComb announced via Facebook that this loan is not to build a plant and will result in no increase to your water bill.

Despite a heated debate during the City Council meeting, there were enough council members who voted (6-3) in favor of pursuing an $11.4 million loan from the Texas Water Development Board.

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Area citizens unite against desal plants – Texas

Corpus Christi’s controversial seawater desalination plants have been in the works since 2014 and in May took another step toward completion with the Corpus Christi City Council approving action to apply for financial assistance. 

The city began evaluating potential future water supplies in 2014 as a result of the drought conditions experienced in 2010-2013. After intensive evaluation by a multi-disciplinary group during the first phase, the conclusion was reached that seawater desalination was feasible as a new source for some of the region’s’ water supply needs.

The two plants will be located at the Inner Harbor Ship Channel in Port Aransas next to the ferry landing and the other in the vicinity of La Quinta Channel in San Patricio County.

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Corpus Christi coalition to host drive-by petition protesting planned desalination plants – Texas

A coalition of seven Corpus Christi groups will host a weekly drive-by public petition against any desalination plant plans in the Coastal Bend. 

The drive-by will be from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturdays at Oleander Point. The group, called, Save the Bay for the Greater Good, is also mailing out more than 25,000 petitions.

The coalition expects enough signatures to require the city of Corpus Christi to hold an election to allow Corpus Christi residents to vote on a charter amendment restricting the city from building desalination plants, according to a coalition news release. 

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Corpus Christi applies for $222 million loan for desalination plant in port’s Inner Harbor – Texas

The city of Corpus Christi is exploring securing $222 million in loans to pay for its first seawater desalination plant.

The City Council on Tuesday authorized its staff to apply to the Texas Water Development Board for the money.

The funds, if approved, would cover costs to both the design and build the facility in the Port of Corpus Christi’s Inner Harbor.

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