Texas

Area citizens unite against desal plants – Texas

Corpus Christi’s controversial seawater desalination plants have been in the works since 2014 and in May took another step toward completion with the Corpus Christi City Council approving action to apply for financial assistance. 

The city began evaluating potential future water supplies in 2014 as a result of the drought conditions experienced in 2010-2013. After intensive evaluation by a multi-disciplinary group during the first phase, the conclusion was reached that seawater desalination was feasible as a new source for some of the region’s’ water supply needs.

The two plants will be located at the Inner Harbor Ship Channel in Port Aransas next to the ferry landing and the other in the vicinity of La Quinta Channel in San Patricio County.

(LINK).

Corpus Christi coalition to host drive-by petition protesting planned desalination plants – Texas

A coalition of seven Corpus Christi groups will host a weekly drive-by public petition against any desalination plant plans in the Coastal Bend. 

The drive-by will be from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturdays at Oleander Point. The group, called, Save the Bay for the Greater Good, is also mailing out more than 25,000 petitions.

The coalition expects enough signatures to require the city of Corpus Christi to hold an election to allow Corpus Christi residents to vote on a charter amendment restricting the city from building desalination plants, according to a coalition news release. 

(LINK).

Corpus Christi applies for $222 million loan for desalination plant in port’s Inner Harbor – Texas

The city of Corpus Christi is exploring securing $222 million in loans to pay for its first seawater desalination plant.

The City Council on Tuesday authorized its staff to apply to the Texas Water Development Board for the money.

The funds, if approved, would cover costs to both the design and build the facility in the Port of Corpus Christi’s Inner Harbor.

(LINK).

Midkiff farmer, Encore Green team on produced water project – Texas

Amid talk of trying to expand the market for the water that’s produced alongside crude oil and natural gas beyond the oil patch, one company is putting its words into action.

Wyoming-based Encore Green Environmental had visited the Produced Water Society Permian Basin’s conference last August to promote its idea of pairing the oil and gas and agriculture industries, sparking the interest of Cody Wilson and his S&S Wilson Farms in Midkiff.

Today, the two are moving forward with a project that will treat produced water for use in irrigating the cotton on Wilson’s farm as well as producing electricity that can be sold back into the electric grid.

(LINK).

Coastal Bend desalination plant closer to reality – Texas

After decades of talk, it looks like desalination is the wave of the future for the city’s water supply; and with time to spare.

The Corpus Christi City Council approved a plan Tuesday which will determine when the city will need to have a alternate water supply. The plan also moves the city forward with plans for a saltwater desalination plant.

If everything goes according to plan, a desal plant could be up-and-running either somewhere along the Corpus Christi Ship Channel, or in San Patricio County’s La Quinta corridor, by the end of 2022.

(LINK).

Corpus Christi desalination plans could soon become less murky – Texas

The city of Corpus Christi has long made known its desire to bring seawater desalination to the area, but where such a facility would be located has remained unknown.

That question is closer to being answered, after council members were presented Tuesday an update on the status of the city’s ongoing efforts to identify alternative water sources.

The city is looking at sites along the La Quinta Channel and the Inner Harbor, but have not identified specific locations for a seawater desalination plant.

(LINK).

NMSU to host Two Nations One Water summit

Water scarcity is a critical issue for New Mexico, Texas and Mexico, and the Two Nations One Water U.S.-Mexico Border Water Summit 2019 will address this challenge and more at the April 23-25 event at the New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum.

The New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute at New Mexico State University will host the conference, which is in its second year. 

“The Two Nations One Water conference provides a platform for a broad audience to explore adaptive water strategies for managing drought in the border region,” said Pei Xu, NMSU civil engineering associate professor.

“The conference will address the complex interrelationships among water, agriculture, energy, the economy and socio-political realities. It provides an opportunity for managers, policy makers, government and non-governmental agencies, researchers, students, farmers, ranchers, producers and other stakeholders to participate in learning, sharing and networking.

Participants from the U.S. and Mexico will present and share their experiences on water issues along the U.S.-Mexico border.

(LINK).

El Paso to drink treated sewage water due to climate change drought – Texas

The people of El Paso, Texas, are resilient. Living in the middle of the harsh Chihuahuan Desert, the city has no other choice. On average, 15 days every year spike over 100 degrees Fahrenheit.

The city gets little relief with annual rainfall of just about 9 inches. It’s one of the hottest cities in the country.

One of its prime sources of water is the Rio Grande. Typically the river can supply as much as half of the city’s water needs.

(LINK).

Texas City to Guzzle Drinking Water from Treated Waste – Texas

The city of El Paso, Texas, may soon become the first large city in the US to use treated sewage water for its drinking water needs. 

The amount of snowmelt feeding the Rio Grande has dropped 25% since 1958 and is “critically low,” J. Phillip King, an adviser to the Elephant Butte Irrigation District, told CNN.

The use of treated wastewater will add a significant source of water to the city’s supplies.

(LINK).

Why Environmental Groups Are Salty on Corpus Christi’s Pricey Desalination Plan – Corpus Christi – Texas

Having tried little else to save its water supply, Corpus Christi is considering an option that no other Texas city has embraced: seawater desalination. The strategy has long been considered a far-in-the-future option because of its cost, logistical challenges and environmental side effects.

Nonetheless, Corpus is plunging ahead in the hopes of diversifying its water supply, which consists entirely of three shallow surface water lakes that rapidly shrink during droughts.

City officials argue that desalination would provide an uninterruptible supply of water for the city’s growing port and industrial area.

(LINK).

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