Texas

The City of Alice made a deal for a brackish desalination plant – Texas

The City of Alice has reached an agreement with Florida-based Seven Seas Water Group   for the construction of a brackish water desalination plant to provide fresh drinking water to the residents. 

Seven Seas Water Group will finance, design, build, operate and maintain a Brackish Water Reverse Osmosis plant on land owned by the city, according to a news release that touted the public-private partnership as the first of its kind in Texas.

In July 2019, the Texas Water Development Board approved roughly $5.5 million for the project’s first phase. This includes about $4 million in loans and a $1.5 million grant. 

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San Antonio built a pipeline to rural Central Texas to increase its water supply. Now local landowners say their wells are running dry – Texas

When the water finally arrived, San Antonio’s leadership could relax. The roughly 150-mile long water pipeline to the northeast guaranteed the city’s economic future and freed residents from the stress of droughts.

“We have water security for decades to come,” said Robert Puente, president and CEO of the San Antonio Water System. Puente called the project, which came online in April 2020, the “biggest achievement in our lifetimes” to secure water for the city.

The pipeline helped conserve the sensitive Edwards Aquifer, upon which San Antonio has historically depended for water.

Port of CC commissioners vote to purchase more than 700 acres from Cheniere – Texas – United States

The Port of Corpus Christi Authority expanded its portfolio with the purchase of two separate parcels of land equaling more than 700 acres of San Patricio County property from Cheniere Energy.

Last Tuesday, port authority commissioners voted to adopt a resolution authorizing closing on a commercial contract which would see the port purchase a 552.087-acre tract of land in Ingleside on the La Quinta Channel and 158.65-acre tract of land south of Taft.

“We’ve been in serious negotiations with Cheniere for over half a year on this property,” Port of Corpus Christi Chief Financial Officer Kent Britton said.

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The latest on the Desalination Plant in Corpus Christi – Texas

That is because on and off, the Coastal Bend falls into a drought, and as you may recall, this area is in a stage one water restriction.

Following a dangerous drought in 2011, an idea was born to bring a more resilient, reliable, and cost-effective water source to the Coastal Bend.

More specifically, a drought-resistant water supply that could produce up to 20 million gallons of potable water daily.

(LINK).

Desalination Breakthrough Could Lead to Cheaper Water Filtration – Texas

Producing clean water at a lower cost could be on the horizon after researchers from The University of Texas at Austin and Penn State solved a complex problem that had baffled scientists for decades, until now.

Desalination membranes remove salt and other chemicals from water, a process critical to the health of society, cleaning billions of gallons of water for agriculture, energy production and drinking.

The idea seems simple — push salty water through and clean water comes out the other side — but it contains complex intricacies that scientists are still trying to understand.

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Water restrictions puts spotlight back on desalination plant conversation – Texas

The restrictions are part of the drought contingency plan and are based on the combined capacity lake levels of Lake Corpus Christi and the Choke Canyon Reservoir.

That level has now fallen to below 40-percent.For most of us, the initial part of this plan will affect when we water the lawn.

Corpus Christi’s Mayor Joe McComb said finding an alternative water source could very well help the city avoid future water restrictions during drought conditions.

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Windsor Park Elementary students debate topic of desalination – Texas

It’s a highly debated issue, whether the city of Corpus Christi should construct a multi-million-dollar saltwater desalination plant in the city’s inner harbor.

On Friday, some of our youngest citizens tackled the real-world topic.

They may be third graders, but a group of Windsor Park Elementary students took time to debate the pros and cons of building a desal plant and what it could mean for a future water supply.

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City of Corpus Christi approved for $11.4 million loan to continue seawater desal project – Texas

The City of Corpus Christi is continuing with its $222 million seawater desalination project after being approved for an $11.4 million loan from the Texas Water Development Board.

The $11.4 million loan from the Texas Water Development Board will allow the City of Corpus Christi to do more research about where and how the seawater desalination plant would fit in the Coastal Bend, according to Steve Ramos, Water Resource Manager for the City.

Ramos said by doing more research, when it comes time to present an execution plan, all the kinks are worked out.

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Here’s what desalination plant projects private companies presented to City Council – Texas

The city of Corpus Christi won’t decide how it’s going to build and operate a desalination plant until next year or 2022. 

But during its regular meeting Tuesday, City Council heard from 10 companies that presented their proposals for alternative water sources for Corpus Christi.

Two of the proposals were for ground water projects, two were for wastewater reuse and six were for desalination. 

(LINK).

McComb: Passage for first loan for Desal Plant will result in ‘no increase’ to your water bill – Texas – United States

On August 25, Corpus Christi City Council members voted to accept a loan from the Texas Water Development Board to execute the next step in building a Seawater Desalination Plant.

Mayor Joe McComb announced via Facebook that this loan is not to build a plant and will result in no increase to your water bill.

Despite a heated debate during the City Council meeting, there were enough council members who voted (6-3) in favor of pursuing an $11.4 million loan from the Texas Water Development Board.

(LINK).