Sydney

Prime Minister’s ‘Crucial’ Visit At Sydney’s Desalination Plant – Australia

Prime Minister Voreqe Bainimarama, as part of his official state visit to Australia, vis­ited the Sydney Desalina­tion Plant yesterday morn­ing.

Accompanied by his high-powered delegation, Prime Minister Bainima­rama said the visit to the plant was crucial because it would assist the Govern­ment in setting up similar desalination plants, par­ticularly in the maritime islands such as the Lau Group and Yasawa.

The Fijian Government aims to allocate resources for sustained maintenance and construction of new water treatment plants, reservoirs and reticula­tion systems, rural water schemes, development of groundwater sources, set­ting up of desalination plants in the maritime re­gion, and distribution of water tanks in rural areas.

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Sydney dam levels drop below 50 per cent for first time in 12 years – Sydney

Sydney’s dam storage levels have dipped below 50 per cent for the first time in 12 years with no end in sight to drought conditions.

Greater Sydney’s dam capacity this week fell to 49.7 per cent, according to Water NSW, which is 0.4 per cent down from the previous week.

That means dam levels are below 50 per cent for the first time since 2007. They initially dropped under the halfway mark in 2004.

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Sydney’s desalination plant set to expand as drought continues – Australia

The New South Wales government has begun preliminary planning to boost output at Sydney’s desalination plant, in a bid to secure the city’s water supply as dam levels continue to drop.

The Kurnell plant, which can currently supply drinking water for up to 1.5 million people in Sydney, returned to operation in January for the second time since 2012.

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Planning starts to enable Kurnell desalination plant to double output – Australia

The state government has begun “preliminary planning” to expand the Kurnell desalination plant as Sydney dam levels continue to drop at record pace.

The plant is producing 250 million litres of water a day at present, but was constructed in such a way that capacity can be scaled up to 500 million litres per day.

Minister for Water, Property and Housing Melinda Pavey said the state was experiencing the worst drought on record and the desalination plant wad playing a significant role in maintaining Sydney’s water supply.

Desalination plant restart ahead of schedule as dam levels slide – Sydney

The restart of Sydney’s desalination plant is proceeding faster than expected, helping to slow the drawdown of the city’s reservoirs amid the ongoing drought.

The $2.3 billion plant, which resumed operations in January, has been supplying water to Sydney’s network for about six weeks. Production is now between 300 and 400 million litres per week.

“In line with our operating licence, [the plant] has until September to reach its maximum capacity of producing 250 million litres per day of water – or about 15 per cent of Sydney’s drinking water requirements,” Keith Davies, the facility’s chief executive, said.

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Sydney desal plant restart ahead of schedule as dam levels continue slide – Sydney

The restart of Sydney’s desalination plant is proceeding faster than expected, helping to slow the drawdown of the city’s reservoirs amid the ongoing drought.

The $2.3 billion plant, which resumed operations in January, has been supplying water to Sydney’s network for about six weeks. Production is now between 300 and 400 million litres per week.

“In line with our operating licence, [the plant] has until September to reach its maximum capacity of producing 250 million litres per day of water – or about 15 per cent of Sydney’s drinking water requirements,” Keith Davies, the facility’s chief executive, said.

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Desalination plant should be reserved for extreme occasions – Sydney

This weekend brings a bittersweet moment when Sydneysiders are reminded that we don’t live on just those sweet rains from heaven. After six years of trouble and tempest, we’re getting our desalination plant back.

The plant, at Kurnell, is designed to be used when Sydney’s dams fall below 60 per cent capacity, a (water) mark expected this weekend.

When running at full tilt, in six to eight months from switching on, the plant will produce 250 million litres a day – or about 15 per cent of Sydney’s drinking water.

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Berejiklian eager to switch on Sydney desalination plant – Sydney – Australia

It’s little wonder the Berejiklian government is eager to switch on the Sydney desalination plant and end the “water security mode” it has languished in since 2012.

At full bore, the Kurnell plant is designed to deliver about 91 billion litres of drinking water a year, meeting almost a sixth of Sydney’s annual needs.

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Sydney dam levels plummeting as desalination plant stalls – Sydney – Australia

A multimillion dollar desalination plant built to address water shortages in Sydney a decade ago may not be fully operational until next August.

As drought continues to grip New South Wales, Sydney’s dam levels are falling at such a rapid rate that the city’s only desalination plant could be needed for the first time since 2012.

Sydney’s total water storage fell to 65% this week, down about a quarter since last year. Warragamba Dam, the city’s largest water source, is at 68.3%. Twelve months ago it was at 90.7% capacity.

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Dam levels take a dive as the big dry tightens its grip – Sydney – Australia

The Kurnell desalination plant which has sat idle for the past five years may need to be switched back on if Sydney’s dam levels continue to fall.

Water levels at storages supplying the Sydney metropolitan area are sinking amid a lack of rain and rising consumption.

The total storage levels for the Sydney region are running at about two-thirds full, with the desalination plant set to be turned on to supplement the water supply when capacity drops to 60 per cent, according to WaterNSW.

 

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