South America

Temporary shutdown of desal plant – Trinidad and Tobago

Thousands of people in Central and South-West Trinidad will be without water this weekend after the WASA announced a temporary shutdown of the desalination plant in Point Lisas yesterday.

The disruption in the supply of pipe-borne water is as a result of emergency repairs to a 42-inch diameter raw water pipeline at the plant, WASA said in a statement.

WASA normally receives a daily supply of 40 million gallons of water from the plant, it noted.

(LINK).

Shutdown at Point Lisas Desalination Plant – South America

The Water and Sewerage Authority advises customers in parts of Central and South-West Trinidad, who are presently experiencing low water pressures or no water that, this is as a result of the shutdown of the Point Lisas Desalination Plant, due to what has been described as raw water quality issues.

However, a time for restarting the plant has not been given. As such, a limited truck-borne water service will be available with priority given to special homes, health care and government institutions.

The WASA advisory explains the Desalination Company of Trinidad and Tobago (DESALCOTT) owned and operated Plant, normally supplies WASA with 40 million gallons of water per day (mgd).

(LINK).

Chilean debate on desalination regulation takes shape – Chile

Chilean lawmakers are debating how to regulate the increasing number of desalination plants in the country, noting that there are no frameworks for their environmental assessment, use of maritime concessions and their position within the country’s overall water strategy.

A motion currently being reviewed by the senate’s water resources committee would declare desalinated water an asset for public use, prioritize it for human consumption, set requirements to request maritime concessions and establish a national strategy for the sector that would create incentives for technological innovation and development.

During the legislative discussion, senator Isabel Allende said that the bill could be improved, but that “we’re heading down the right path,” as it would create regulations “that don’t currently exist, which is the worst-case scenario.”

(LINK).

Fog-Catching Towers Could Supply Water to the World’s Driest Megacity Using The Ocean Air – Peru

How can a megacity find water for 10 million people if it exists in the desert? Fog-catching nets, erected on hills over the city of Lima could solve the city’s water shortages for good.

A twenty-meter high (60 feet) tower of spiraling nets will be unveiled this summer in the city as a solution to the threat which a warming climate poses to the shaky foundations of water availability in Lima.

Aside from glacial runoff from the Andes, and water from the stressed Rímac River, Peru’s capital city accumulates just one inch of rain a year. The city sees high annual temperatures, and water consumption rates, despite being located in a desert, are higher than world averages.

(LINK).

Chile’s Minister of Mines and Energy prepares for new cycle of expansion – Chile

As copper prices hit their highest level in almost a decade, Chile’s mining industry is preparing for a new cycle of expansion.

“We hope that if the price cycle remains high, which is what most analysts expect, that this accelerates the development of new mine projects,” Chile’s Mines and Energy Minister Juan Carlos Jobet said in an interview with The Northern Miner.

The government has identified mining projects worth US$74 billion in development, of which almost a third are already in construction. They include Teck’s (TSX: TECK.A/TECK.B; NYSE: TCK) US$4.5 billion Quebrada Blanca project, an expansion of Antofagasta plc‘s (LSE: ANTO) Los Pelambres mine and Codelco’s massive program to overhaul its aging mine operations.

(LINK).

Antofagasta’s Los Pelambres expansion to cost extra $400m – Chile

Chilean miner Antofagasta revealed on Wednesday that the expansion project at its Los Pelambres operation in the home country would cost $1.7 billion, up from the original $1.3 billion, due mainly to revised marine works and value of a desalination plant extension.

Construction of the project resumed in August, after a four-month halt triggered by the covid-19 pandemic.

A detailed review of the schedule and costs, including those associated with the realized and ongoing restrictions linked to the global pandemic followed. The assessment also considered changes to the marine works to enable an expansion of the desalination plant.

(LINK).

Desalcott to shut down again – south, central Trinidad affected – The Caribbean

At a joint news conference held today by the Water and Sewerage Authority and the Desalination Company of Trinidad and Tobago (Desalcott), at Desalcott’s office in Point Lisas, John Thompson, General Manager – Desalcott advised of an upcoming planned shutdown of its Point Lisas Desalination Plant to facilitate maintenance works.

Alan Poon-King, acting CEO – WASA, provided details on how the Authority planned to mitigate the impact on the shutdown on customers.

The planned shutdown which is scheduled to take place from Monday November 16 to Tuesday November 24, will mostly impact the pipe borne water supply to areas in Central and South Trinidad.

(LINK).

IDE Technologies secures contract for desalination plant in Chile – Chile

IDE Technologies, a global leader in desalination and water treatment, was recently awarded by Aguas Pacífico SpA the EPC contract for the Aconcagua Desalination Plant in Chile.

The project includes the engineering, supply, construction, start-up and commissioning of a seawater reverse osmosis desalination plant with a nominal production capacity of 86,400 m3/day (1,000 liters per second), that will be in the bay of Quintero in the Valparaíso Region of Chile.

The plant will be the first drought-proof source of fresh water in the Aconcagua basin to serve municipal, agricultural, industrial and mining clients in the region.

(LNK).

Point Fortin, La Brea residents to face supply disruption on Tuesday – The Caribbean

The Water and Sewerage Authority (WASA) is advising customers served by the Point Fortin Desalination Plant that they may experience low pressures or no water supply on Tuesday, September 22.

This will take place between the hours of 8 am and 10 pm.

WASA says this is for Seven Seas Water, owner/operator of the Point Fortin Desalination Plant, to carry out emergency repair works to a 12-inch diameter pipeline at the facility.

(LINK).

Desalination is not the only answer to Chile’s water problems – Chile

Chile produces nearly a quarter of the world’s copper supply, with the majority of production coming from the northern provinces (Exhibit 1). That same region is one of the driest places on the planet.

During 2019, Chile experienced its worst drought in decades, with the government having to supply fresh water to almost 400,000 residents.

Annually, the mining industry consumes enough water to provide for 75 percent of the needs of Chile’s population.

(LINK).