South Africa

No water restrictions: ‘City of Cape Town is not fully coming to the party’ – Cape Town

Cape Town – The City decided to lift water restrictions in Cape Town and to move to the lowest tariff, being the no-restriction, water-wise tariff from November 1.

The mayoral committee (mayco) unanimously supported the decision which will be presented before council for noting next week.

Mayor Dan Plato said: “Mayco has noted the expert advice from the City’s water and sanitation department and we support its decision to lift the water restrictions and to lower the water and sanitation tariff to the lowest approved level by council.

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Cape desalination plants take a final bow – Cape Town

The Monwabisi desalination plant is being decommissioned as the two-years period for which it was hired has to come to an end.

Decommissioning of its counterpart is Strandfontein already commenced in June this year, and is currently underway.

This city commissioned both the Monwabisi and Strandfontein temporary desalination plants to provide emergency water supply in the event that it was needed, as we faced the prospect of Day Zero

Desalination: Why the future of water innovation is informal and local – Mediterranean Sea

Israel, the Middle East and South Africa share a common fate of growing water scarcity in the face of growing water demand and the impact of climate change on water availability.

One of the greatest challenges the two regions face is the large percentage of the population that lacks access to water and wastewater infrastructure.

Lack of access or intermittent access to drinking water, sewage treatment and disposal and energy impede these populations’ abilities to improve their socioeconomic situation miring them in poverty.

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Municipality asks Bay residents to ‘pray for rain’ – Eastern Cape

That is the word from Nelson Mandela Bay infrastructure and engineering portfolio head Mongameli Bobani.

The municipality said on Friday there were continued water disruptions in parts of the city due to the Emerald Hill reservoir running dry and the Chelsea reservoir level at an alarming 11%.

Bobani said water should be restored to those areas by Friday evening, but divine intervention was also needed.

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Teshie Desalination Project was set up to milk the country – South Africa

He said had it not been for contractual obligations, he would have terminated the project contract if he had his way.

Speaking on the topic “Making State Enterprises Profitable and Resilient”, Asabee said “Why would you want to desalinate seawater when you have clean water bodies like the Volta that has been dammed at Akosombo and, you can even supply to Togo if you are serious.

It is terrible, if I had my way, I’ll cancel it.”

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No more salt water for now, says Ugu – South Africa

In 2015, South Coasters turned on their taps to find salt water filling their glasses, sinks and bath tubs.

This was the case across the coast for some weeks until, at a cost of R6 million the salt water was cleared and the mouth of the Umzimkhulu River opened.

According to a report from Ugu at the time, R3.7 million of that was allocated for the construction of a temporary berm system as a desalination method to prevent sea water from entering the river.

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Dam levels continue to drop – South Africa

Mossel Bay Municipality appeals to residents to continue to use water sparingly as dam levels continue to drop steadily.

Cognisant of the economic impact of the Covid-19 pandemic and the requirement for residents to regularly wash their hands to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, the municipal Council accepted a resolution that water restrictions be put on hold until the Wolwedans dam level drops to below 50%.

In terms of the Department of Water and Sanitation dam operating rules, a 10% restriction must be applied to all residential consumers when the dam level drops below 60%.

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City decommissions Standfontein desalination plant – Cape Town

The Standfontein desalination plant was decommissioned at midnight on Wednesday, June 17 a month earlier than scheduled. Over a period of two years, the temporary plant contributed massively to the City’s water supply, providing 3.8 billion litres at a time when Cape Town was close to running out of potable water. The plant will now be broken down and the land restored to its former condition.

Since it commissioned the desalination plant two years ago, the City of Cape Town said, it “has acquired valuable knowledge through hands-on experience about the operation of this alternative water technology”.

City officials now feel confident about their ability to pursue the large scale desalination project included in the Water Strategy.

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LETTER: We spent more than R30m on desalination plants, so what has happened to them? – Western Cape

It is reported that the Western Cape’s dams are on average 35.7% full (or empty).

The dams in Cape Town are 53.6% full. Now, is there a panic? Do we need more water at this stage?

Maybe we do. So if we don’t get enough rain soon will we have a serious problem? Well, what do the citizens out there think? My point is, isn’t it exactly for this reason that the CoCT embarked upon the idea of constructing and installing desalination plants? So, if there happen to be very low dams, aren’t the plants supposed to kick in? Are they functioning? Are they ready?

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Ensuring water security in South Africa – South Africa

With increasing pressure from population growth and the need for water to support economic growth, South Africa’s water security is increasingly at risk. Additional threats are posed by climate change, land-use changes, declining water quality, and catchment degradation.

“Not only is it vital that South Africa continues to invest in the development of its physical infrastructure systems, we must also invest in the people who manage these system and maintain our critical ecological infrastructure such as wetlands, catchments, groundwater aquifers, and river systems,” Aurecon Technical Director James Cullis (Pr Eng, PhD in Civil and Environmental Engineering) comments.

Aurecon is currently in the process of rebranding as Zutari, after officially announcing the separation of the African business from the Aurecon Group, effective from 1 January 2020.

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