South Africa

Covid-19: Handwashing is ‘not a threat’ to Cape Town’s water supply

Cape Town – The City of Cape Town has said residents must continue washing their hands in a bid to curb the spread of the Covid-19 pandemic and not to worry that it might be a threat to the water supply.

This comes as the weekly dams level statistics were released on Monday, showing that dams supplying the Cape metro have declined by 1,3% over the past week (9 March – 15 March 2020) to 61,3% of total capacity.

Mayco member for water and waste Xanthea Limberg said: “While mindful consumption of water is still important, the City encourages residents to proceed with diligent hand-washing practices for the benefit of our individual and collective health. Hand-washing uses comparatively less water than other activities and is not expected to pose a threat to water security.”

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Four companies partner to launch Sh435m solar water desalination project in Kenya – Kenya

Arid and semi-arid areas are set to benefit from clean water after four companies partnered to launch a water desalination project worth Sh435 million. 

The Germany-based firms Boreal Light GmbH and AtmosfairegGmbH will work with Water Kiosk Ltd and Bilal Sustainable Development Programme to construct 40 solar water desalination systems in 10 counties facing water shortage.

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Kenya Installs the First Solar Plant That Transforms Ocean Water Into Drinking Water – Kenya

Water should not be luxury product, but still in these modern times, one out of nine people doesn’t have access to clean drinking water.

This main issue here is that only around 4% of earth’s water sources are rivers, lakes and drinkable water, the rest is comprised of oceans with salty water.

These are all alarming statistics, but luckily in many such places around the world things are starting to improve thanks to new technologies.

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A new solar desalination system to address water scarcity – Kenya

GivePower is launching containerized, solar-powered water desalination and purification plants in Mombasa, Kenya and La Gonave, Haiti this quarter.

Like GivePower’s debut solar-powered microgrid desalination plant, which went live in Kiunga, Kenya in 2018, these new projects will operate with Tesla’s powerwall battery storage technology.

At launch, both of the nonprofit’s new solar water farm projects will produce a maximum of 75,000 liters of water a day by coupling a 50-kW solar system with 120 kW-hrs of Tesla batteries; together this solar plus battery system will power two low-wattage, reverse osmosis desalination pumps that run simultaneously to ensure continuous operation.

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Drought worsening in large parts of Eastern Cape – Africa

Residents in Port Alfred are left without water for long periods and some are totally reliant on water tanks for their supply

The drought affecting large parts of the Eastern Cape is worsening.  The coastal town of Port Alfred and the surrounding towns in the Ndlambe Municipality have almost run out of water.

The areas supply dam is only 6% full and water rationing is in place.  The municipality is calling on residents to use water sparingly to avoid a day zero scenario.

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Tesla batteries help power new solar water desalination plant in Africa – Kenya

GivePower has deployed a new water desalination plant in Africa using Tesla batteries and solar power that is now providing clean water to thousands of people.

The system has been deployed in Kiunga, a rural village in Kenya where the lack of clean water had people sometimes rely on saltwater wells or even contaminated water.

Desalination is a power-consuming process that is hard to implement in a place where power is already scarce.

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Relief as Mtongwe gets solar-powered desalination plant – Kenya

Mtongwe residents can now smile all the way to their kitchens, drink fresh water and kiss their acute water shortage problems goodbye. 

This is after a charitable organisation installed a solar-powered water desalination plant in the area which has been experiencing frequent water shortages forcing residents to travel long distances to fetch salty water.

The plant, installed by Bilal Muslim Mission of Kenya with the support of Borea Light GmbH and the Irene and Friedrich Vorwerk Foundation, can desalinate 2,000 litres per hour and up to 20,000 litres per day.

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Desalination plant output hits record high – Namibia

Originally built by Orano (then Areva Resources Namibia) to supply water to its Trekkopje Mine near Arandis, the desalination plant is now an important contributor to the overall supply of the potable water delivery system managed by Namwater.

It provides about 75% of the overall drinking water to Swakopmund, as well as the nearby uranium mines and other industries.

Located 35 kilometres north of Swakopmund, it is the largest reverse osmosis seawater desalination plant in southern Africa.

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Solar desalination aids water crisis – South Africa

South Africa is facing a serious water crisis, particularly the provinces of the Western Cape, Northern Cape and Witsand in the Hessequa Municipality.

The Western Cape was chosen as the location for Africa’s first seawater solar desalination plant.

Despite the recognition that access to water and sanitation is a human right, in 2015, 3 in 10 people (2.1 billion) did not have access to safe drinking water, and 6 in 10 (4.5 billion) had no access to safely managed sanitation facilities.

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Call for comment on proposed desalination plant – Durban

Durban – The Department of Environmental Affairs is calling for public comment after it recently granted an environmental authorisation for a proposed desalination plant in the north of eThekwini near oThongathi.

Desalination refers to the process of removing salt from seawater to make it fit for human consumption.

Umgeni Water – the applicants in the project – stressed that while the environmental authorisation had been granted, there was no intention to construct a desalination plant in the north or south of eThekwini at this stage.

(LINK).

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