South Africa

Desalination could be an option for KZN, but not in the near future – Durban

Desalination may be considered as an option to supply additional water for the growing population in and around Durban, in KwaZulu-Natal, in the long term, but Umgeni Water is continuing with plans for more traditional water schemes for now.

Umgeni Water planning services manager Kevin Meier this week said the utility had conducted a detailed feasibility study to look at desalination as a bulk water supplier a few years ago.

It considered the viability of two large-scale desalination plants – one on the South Coast just outside Durban, and the other near Tongaat on the North Coast.

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City of Cape Town vows to defend contractual dispute over desalination plant – Cape Town

The City of Cape Town Council says it filed an intention to defend a litigation battle with Quality Filtration Systems (QFS) in connection with contractual disputes over its desalination plants.

“It must be understood clearly that the city did not institute court proceedings, it was QFS,” the City of Cape Town Council said.

Mayoral committee member for water and waste services Xanthea Limberg said the city council did not intend to litigate through the media, but it was understood the two parties were in meetings trying to negotiate an out of court settlement. Last month, QFS lodged court papers in the Western Cape High Court.

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Coca-Cola invests millions to ensure SA water security – South Africa

In light of debilitating water shortages throughout South Africa, the Coca-Cola Foundation has pledged to help alleviate this constant issue experienced throughout the country, which has been exacerbated thanks to climate change.

The foundation has invested $1.28 million (approximately R18 million) to help replenish water back into nature. It has done this through the Replenish Africa Initiative (RAIN) and has invested in five projects to remove invasive alien plant species that feed on major cities and towns.

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Namibia: ‘Desalination Solution to Water Crisis’ – Namibia

Namibia needs at least three desalination plants to address the country’s water shortage, a University of Namibia professor says.

Unam acting pro-vice chancellor for research, innovation and development, professor Frank Kavishe said this at the university’s Sam Nujoma campus at Henties Bay on Tuesday.

The event was also attended by former president Sam Nujoma and Swapo secretary general Sophia Shaningwa.

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Desalination plant provider takes legal action against City of Cape Town – Cape Town

Cape Town – The company in charge of the desalination plant at the Waterfront is taking legal action against the City.

Quality Filtration Systems (QFS) lodged court papers in the Western Cape High Court on Thursday. 

QFS managing director Herman Smit said: “The plant is still not in operation as the contractual disputes have not been settled. The City has failed to clarify its legal position relative to the water to be injected. QFS have, via their legal advisor, formally advised the City that QFS does not believe the City is meeting its legal obligations to comply with the necessary water safety regulations.”

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Infrastructure upgrades improve drinking water in SA’s North West

SA Water has completed water infrastructure upgrades at Watinuma in the state’s remote north west and work have now begun further west in the Murputja region to improve the safety and reliability of drinking water to local communities.

In late 2017, the state-wide utility took on management of water services in an additional three Aboriginal communities in the APY Lands — Kanpi, Nyapari and Watinuma — as well as government facilities at Murputja.

SA Water’s General Manager of Customers, Strategy and Innovation, Anna Jackson, said supplying water to such a vast remote area brings unique challenges, so the teams and contractors working to maintain and upgrade the equipment have had to think outside the box.

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Work to commence on R15bn Amdec Group Harbour Arch precinct – Cape Town

Good news for the Cape Town property market as work is set to commence on major new developments, among them the Amdec Group’s R15bn Harbour Arch precinct.

Early purchasers will be reaping the rewards of buying into Harbour Arch, but there is still value to be had with the second tower launching this year. 

It competes on a global scale in terms of quality and innovation, which means there is a fair expectation of it yielding consistently strong returns on investment.

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Desalination plant ends contract with City of Cape Town, plans to sue – Cape Town

Quality Filtration Systems (QFS), the V&A Waterfront desalination plant owner, has terminated its water supply contract with the City of Cape Town and will pursue legal action. The City was notified of this decision on May 7, GroundUp reports.

“The City is disappointed with this unilateral decision and is now considering the legal ramifications,” the city said in a media statement on May 9.

The R60-million plant has been dormant since February, due to concerns about dirty sea water.

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CoCT ‘knew water was contaminated’ before awarding desalination plant tender – Cape Town

Cape Town – The company that built the desalination plant at the Waterfront, and is threatening the City of Cape Town with legal action over outstanding payments, said the city knew the water was contaminated before the tender was awarded.

Quality Filtration System (QFS) said they had uncovered information that the city was aware of the same contamination in the seawater in 2017 but neglected to divulge this information during the tender processes.

Herman Smit, managing director of QFS, said: “QFS have, via their legal adviser, formally advised the City that QFS do not believe the city is meeting its legal obligations to comply with the necessary water safety regulations. The city should be conducting routine tests of the local seawater quality and identifying any potential health risks.

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Cape Town’s plan to not run out of water again – Cape Town

Cape Town is drilling boreholes and wells at a rapid rate to ensure it has a stable water supply.

According to a report in the Sunday Times, over 26,000 registered boreholes and wells have been created. This is compared to 1,500 in 2016.

The continued focus on drilling for water comes just over a year after Cape Town faced severe droughts and water shortages.

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