South Africa

Desalination plant output hits record high – Namibia

Originally built by Orano (then Areva Resources Namibia) to supply water to its Trekkopje Mine near Arandis, the desalination plant is now an important contributor to the overall supply of the potable water delivery system managed by Namwater.

It provides about 75% of the overall drinking water to Swakopmund, as well as the nearby uranium mines and other industries.

Located 35 kilometres north of Swakopmund, it is the largest reverse osmosis seawater desalination plant in southern Africa.

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Solar desalination aids water crisis – South Africa

South Africa is facing a serious water crisis, particularly the provinces of the Western Cape, Northern Cape and Witsand in the Hessequa Municipality.

The Western Cape was chosen as the location for Africa’s first seawater solar desalination plant.

Despite the recognition that access to water and sanitation is a human right, in 2015, 3 in 10 people (2.1 billion) did not have access to safe drinking water, and 6 in 10 (4.5 billion) had no access to safely managed sanitation facilities.

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Call for comment on proposed desalination plant – Durban

Durban – The Department of Environmental Affairs is calling for public comment after it recently granted an environmental authorisation for a proposed desalination plant in the north of eThekwini near oThongathi.

Desalination refers to the process of removing salt from seawater to make it fit for human consumption.

Umgeni Water – the applicants in the project – stressed that while the environmental authorisation had been granted, there was no intention to construct a desalination plant in the north or south of eThekwini at this stage.

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Mayor to sign drought disaster declaration for Nelson Mandela Bay – South Africa

Nelson Mandela Bay mayor Mongameli Bobani will sign the declaration for the city to maintain its classification as a disaster area within 48 hours.

This was confirmed by mayoral committee member Andile Lungisa during a visit to the Impofu Dam on Thursday, reports HeraldLIVE.

Lungisa was flanked by the metro’s water and sanitation director Barry Martin and the acting executive director of infrastructure and engineering, Zukile Nogongo.

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Kenya turns to Saudi investor to make water drinkable in arid Turkana region – Kenya

Authorities in Kenya’s driest region are in talks with a Saudi investor to build a desalination plant, after hopes of finding drinking water from an aquifer were dashed.

Tito Ochieng, the director of water services in Turkana, in the north of the country, said the potential investor – Saudi-owned Almar Water – has already signed a deal to build a $160m (£125m) desalination plant in Mombasa.

According to Ochieng, the plant would be built on top of the Lotikipi aquifer, in the village of Nanam, and is expected to cost 5–10bn Kenyan shilling (£37.5–75m).

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City dragged to court for over R20m due to ongoing Cape desalination plant spat – Cape Town

Cape Town – Managers at the desalination plant at the Waterfront intend to continue with litigation against the City due to the lack of progress in reaching a settlement.

Quality Filtration Services (QFS) is dragging the City to court, seeking over R20million in damages after contractual disputes.

The director of QFS, Musa Ndlovu, said: “In response to our papers submitted to the high court in July, the City of Cape Town responded with a plea on August 12.

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South Africa is a world leader in water technology – now we just have to put it into practice – South Africa

South Africa is a top 20 producer of new knowledge in the water domain globally. Many of our innovations can not only help solve South African problems, but also position South Africa as a global manufacturing hub for these products.

South Africa’s economy is being tossed like a cork in the stormy waters of an unprecedented and violent recalibration of the global economy.

Some argue that this is a natural reaction to the adjustment from a uni-polar single superpower world of 20 years ago to the one of multiple centres of power – economic, political and military – we have today.

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Tender briefs … Pilot desalination plants for the south – Namibia

THE national water utility NamWater issued a tender for the construction of experimental desalination plants at Grünau and Bethanie in southern Namibia.

These plants will be powered by renewable energy and membrane technology.

The tender, which is open to Namibian companies and joint ventures, was advertised on the company’s website early this month.

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Desalination could be an option for KZN, but not in the near future – Durban

Desalination may be considered as an option to supply additional water for the growing population in and around Durban, in KwaZulu-Natal, in the long term, but Umgeni Water is continuing with plans for more traditional water schemes for now.

Umgeni Water planning services manager Kevin Meier this week said the utility had conducted a detailed feasibility study to look at desalination as a bulk water supplier a few years ago.

It considered the viability of two large-scale desalination plants – one on the South Coast just outside Durban, and the other near Tongaat on the North Coast.

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City of Cape Town vows to defend contractual dispute over desalination plant – Cape Town

The City of Cape Town Council says it filed an intention to defend a litigation battle with Quality Filtration Systems (QFS) in connection with contractual disputes over its desalination plants.

“It must be understood clearly that the city did not institute court proceedings, it was QFS,” the City of Cape Town Council said.

Mayoral committee member for water and waste services Xanthea Limberg said the city council did not intend to litigate through the media, but it was understood the two parties were in meetings trying to negotiate an out of court settlement. Last month, QFS lodged court papers in the Western Cape High Court.

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