South Africa

Infrastructure upgrades improve drinking water in SA’s North West

SA Water has completed water infrastructure upgrades at Watinuma in the state’s remote north west and work have now begun further west in the Murputja region to improve the safety and reliability of drinking water to local communities.

In late 2017, the state-wide utility took on management of water services in an additional three Aboriginal communities in the APY Lands — Kanpi, Nyapari and Watinuma — as well as government facilities at Murputja.

SA Water’s General Manager of Customers, Strategy and Innovation, Anna Jackson, said supplying water to such a vast remote area brings unique challenges, so the teams and contractors working to maintain and upgrade the equipment have had to think outside the box.

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Work to commence on R15bn Amdec Group Harbour Arch precinct – Cape Town

Good news for the Cape Town property market as work is set to commence on major new developments, among them the Amdec Group’s R15bn Harbour Arch precinct.

Early purchasers will be reaping the rewards of buying into Harbour Arch, but there is still value to be had with the second tower launching this year. 

It competes on a global scale in terms of quality and innovation, which means there is a fair expectation of it yielding consistently strong returns on investment.

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Desalination plant ends contract with City of Cape Town, plans to sue – Cape Town

Quality Filtration Systems (QFS), the V&A Waterfront desalination plant owner, has terminated its water supply contract with the City of Cape Town and will pursue legal action. The City was notified of this decision on May 7, GroundUp reports.

“The City is disappointed with this unilateral decision and is now considering the legal ramifications,” the city said in a media statement on May 9.

The R60-million plant has been dormant since February, due to concerns about dirty sea water.

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CoCT ‘knew water was contaminated’ before awarding desalination plant tender – Cape Town

Cape Town – The company that built the desalination plant at the Waterfront, and is threatening the City of Cape Town with legal action over outstanding payments, said the city knew the water was contaminated before the tender was awarded.

Quality Filtration System (QFS) said they had uncovered information that the city was aware of the same contamination in the seawater in 2017 but neglected to divulge this information during the tender processes.

Herman Smit, managing director of QFS, said: “QFS have, via their legal adviser, formally advised the City that QFS do not believe the city is meeting its legal obligations to comply with the necessary water safety regulations. The city should be conducting routine tests of the local seawater quality and identifying any potential health risks.

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Cape Town’s plan to not run out of water again – Cape Town

Cape Town is drilling boreholes and wells at a rapid rate to ensure it has a stable water supply.

According to a report in the Sunday Times, over 26,000 registered boreholes and wells have been created. This is compared to 1,500 in 2016.

The continued focus on drilling for water comes just over a year after Cape Town faced severe droughts and water shortages.

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South Africa’s Evolving Case to Increase Coastal Shipping – South Africa

South Africa has downsized its domestic railway freight network with the closure of many branch lines, and now long line-ups of big trucks carry coal to some of South Africa’s coal-fired power stations. So, like many other African nations, South Africa’s economy depends on truck transportation.

The increasing number of heavy trucks carrying freight over long distances has taken a toll on South Africa’s deteriorating road network while the crime rate has escalated in response to high unemployment.

The truck transportation industry has become a target for criminals. Drivers who stop to rest at truck stops and act to protect their cargo have been brutally attacked by criminals who take both the freight and various parts of the trucks that they resell.

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Africa’s first sea water solar desalination plant reaches milestone – Africa

The plant, located in Witsand, Western Cape Province, has been fully operational since December 2018, solving the water crisis in the area and providing the local population a steady water supply.

The project, co-funded by the French Treasury and the Province of the Western Cape, has been fully developed and completed in less than 18 months by Turnkey Water Solutions (TWS) and Mascara Renewable Water, together with a strong team of local consultants and contractors.

The OSMOSUN plant, designed by Mascara, is currently producing an average of 150kL of drinkable water per day, two-thirds of the production from solar energy only and at a very competitive price.

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PUWU petitions Akufo-Addo over Teshie Desalination Plant operations – Teshie – Ghana

The Public Utility Workers Union, PUWU has petitioned President Akufo-Addo to discontinue the operations of the Teshie Desalination Plant due to the cost burden on the Ghana Water Company Limited.

According to the petition sighted by Prime Business and signed by the General Secretary of PUWU of TUC GH, Micheal Adumatta Nyantakyi, the Teshie Desalination Plant has the potential to collapse the whole Ghana Water Company.

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SA’s first solar powered desalination plant ready – Saudi Arabia

It’s the very first plant in SA and extendable in Africa which is going to produce drinkable water from sea water with solar energy only.

South Africa’s first solar-powered desalination plant is ready to start pumping water to residents of Witsand near Riversdale in the Southern Cape.

The project is a collaboration between the Western Cape and French governments.

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Former Australian minister to discuss SA water crisis – Cape Town – South Africa

Water Shortage South Africa along with global water expert Professor Anthony Turton and former minister of Victoria Professor John Thwaite are to have a discussion centred around the Cape Town water crisis.

Water Shortage South Africa CEO, Benoit Le Roy in a statement on Monday said Turton warns of the real estate bubble that could well burst in Cape Town as a result of poor leadership, both locally, and nationally during the water crisis.

(LINK).

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