South Africa

City decommissions Standfontein desalination plant – Cape Town

The Standfontein desalination plant was decommissioned at midnight on Wednesday, June 17 a month earlier than scheduled. Over a period of two years, the temporary plant contributed massively to the City’s water supply, providing 3.8 billion litres at a time when Cape Town was close to running out of potable water. The plant will now be broken down and the land restored to its former condition.

Since it commissioned the desalination plant two years ago, the City of Cape Town said, it “has acquired valuable knowledge through hands-on experience about the operation of this alternative water technology”.

City officials now feel confident about their ability to pursue the large scale desalination project included in the Water Strategy.

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LETTER: We spent more than R30m on desalination plants, so what has happened to them? – Western Cape

It is reported that the Western Cape’s dams are on average 35.7% full (or empty).

The dams in Cape Town are 53.6% full. Now, is there a panic? Do we need more water at this stage?

Maybe we do. So if we don’t get enough rain soon will we have a serious problem? Well, what do the citizens out there think? My point is, isn’t it exactly for this reason that the CoCT embarked upon the idea of constructing and installing desalination plants? So, if there happen to be very low dams, aren’t the plants supposed to kick in? Are they functioning? Are they ready?

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Ensuring water security in South Africa – South Africa

With increasing pressure from population growth and the need for water to support economic growth, South Africa’s water security is increasingly at risk. Additional threats are posed by climate change, land-use changes, declining water quality, and catchment degradation.

“Not only is it vital that South Africa continues to invest in the development of its physical infrastructure systems, we must also invest in the people who manage these system and maintain our critical ecological infrastructure such as wetlands, catchments, groundwater aquifers, and river systems,” Aurecon Technical Director James Cullis (Pr Eng, PhD in Civil and Environmental Engineering) comments.

Aurecon is currently in the process of rebranding as Zutari, after officially announcing the separation of the African business from the Aurecon Group, effective from 1 January 2020.

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Nelson Mandela Bay dam levels dropping faster in lockdown – South Africa

As the number of confirmed Covid-19 cases increase in Nelson Mandela Bay, the dam levels continue to decrease — sitting at a combined level of 23.77% on Monday.

Three days before the forced lockdown on March 26, the combined level of the city’s four major storage dams was 25.05%.

Infrastructure and engineering political head Andile Lungisa said the city was facing two disasters, with the consequences of both dire for the city, reports HeraldLIVE.

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Proudly South African hydrogen breakthrough with Shell’s backing – Johannesburg

Hydrox Holdings engineers, based in Strydompark, Randburg, have shot the lights out with a unique hydrogen electrolyser leap forward that deploys innovative patented and already trade-marked local technology that facilitates the use of far fewer components and generates significant cost savings.

This innovative technology promises to lower the production price of hydrogen and serve as a disruptive hydrogen economy enabler.

The homegrown divergent electrode flow through (DEFT ™) technology allows electrolysers to operate without membranes at higher temperatures, which results in greatly improved electrical efficiencies.

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Covid-19: Handwashing is ‘not a threat’ to Cape Town’s water supply

Cape Town – The City of Cape Town has said residents must continue washing their hands in a bid to curb the spread of the Covid-19 pandemic and not to worry that it might be a threat to the water supply.

This comes as the weekly dams level statistics were released on Monday, showing that dams supplying the Cape metro have declined by 1,3% over the past week (9 March – 15 March 2020) to 61,3% of total capacity.

Mayco member for water and waste Xanthea Limberg said: “While mindful consumption of water is still important, the City encourages residents to proceed with diligent hand-washing practices for the benefit of our individual and collective health. Hand-washing uses comparatively less water than other activities and is not expected to pose a threat to water security.”

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Four companies partner to launch Sh435m solar water desalination project in Kenya – Kenya

Arid and semi-arid areas are set to benefit from clean water after four companies partnered to launch a water desalination project worth Sh435 million. 

The Germany-based firms Boreal Light GmbH and AtmosfairegGmbH will work with Water Kiosk Ltd and Bilal Sustainable Development Programme to construct 40 solar water desalination systems in 10 counties facing water shortage.

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Kenya Installs the First Solar Plant That Transforms Ocean Water Into Drinking Water – Kenya

Water should not be luxury product, but still in these modern times, one out of nine people doesn’t have access to clean drinking water.

This main issue here is that only around 4% of earth’s water sources are rivers, lakes and drinkable water, the rest is comprised of oceans with salty water.

These are all alarming statistics, but luckily in many such places around the world things are starting to improve thanks to new technologies.

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A new solar desalination system to address water scarcity – Kenya

GivePower is launching containerized, solar-powered water desalination and purification plants in Mombasa, Kenya and La Gonave, Haiti this quarter.

Like GivePower’s debut solar-powered microgrid desalination plant, which went live in Kiunga, Kenya in 2018, these new projects will operate with Tesla’s powerwall battery storage technology.

At launch, both of the nonprofit’s new solar water farm projects will produce a maximum of 75,000 liters of water a day by coupling a 50-kW solar system with 120 kW-hrs of Tesla batteries; together this solar plus battery system will power two low-wattage, reverse osmosis desalination pumps that run simultaneously to ensure continuous operation.

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Drought worsening in large parts of Eastern Cape – Africa

Residents in Port Alfred are left without water for long periods and some are totally reliant on water tanks for their supply

The drought affecting large parts of the Eastern Cape is worsening.  The coastal town of Port Alfred and the surrounding towns in the Ndlambe Municipality have almost run out of water.

The areas supply dam is only 6% full and water rationing is in place.  The municipality is calling on residents to use water sparingly to avoid a day zero scenario.

(LINK).

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