Sacramento

Santa Barbara’s Water Outlook Foresees Sufficient Supply to Meet Demands Through Fall 2022 – California

Santa Barbara’s water supplies are on the way to recovery followed by three average or above-average rainy seasons.

The city’s water-supply forecasting shows there’s sufficient supply to meet demands through fall 2022, while allowing groundwater basins to slowly recover and rest, water supply analyst Dakota Corey told the city’s Water Commission at Thursday’s special meeting.

The availability of water from Gibraltar Reservoir, upstream on the Santa Ynez River, in the past few years as well as Santa Barbara’s desalination plant operation and water conservation have enabled the city to accumulate a significant amount of stored water in Lake Cachuma, Corey said.

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Online-Only Public Comment for Poseidon Desalination Plant Public Hearing Draws Criticism – California

A state regional water board is drawing public criticism in Orange County for holding meetings on a controversial  desalination plant in Huntington Beach, while public participation can only be done virtually amid the coronavirus health crisis.

The Santa Ana Regional Quality Control Board is meeting this morning to hold a public hearing on Poseidon Water’s request for a permit renewal for their facility, which would be built on 12 acres of a power plant and produce 50 million gallons of water per day, according to water district staff.

The project has remained controversial for years over what critics say will be drastic environmental damage and increased water rates. The approval process for Poseidon Water’s proposal has been marked by legal disputes, permit crusades and lobbying campaigns paid for by the company.

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Solar driving efficient electrochemical water treatment – California

A study from the University of California, Berkeley has illustrated the potential advantages and challenges of using PV to power electrochemical water treatment.

Researchers analyzed how the use of solar power could increase the competitiveness of electrochemical approaches such as electrocoagulation (EC), capacitive deionization (CDI), electrodialysis (ED) and electrodeionization (EDI).

The four methods examined, according to the scientists, are not as capital-intensive as traditional large-scale water treatment centers, while also being modular, portable and energy efficient. The use of solar could also make smaller electrochemical facilities suitable for desalination of brackish water in remote regions.

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SCWD Board Approves Path to By-District Elections – California

The South Coast Water District Board of Directors approved an interim settlement agreement Thursday that clears the way for the agency to transition to by-district voting in 2022.

If the directors approve the new voting system next year, SCWD would join the hundreds of other public agencies to move away from at-large voting under threat of lawsuits authorized by the California Voting Rights Act.

In January, SCWD received a demand letter from Newport Beach attorney Philip Greer who claims to represent a number of SCWD ratepayers concerned that at-large elections stymie candidates who represent the district’s racial and socio-economic diversity. District leaders immediately signaled their acquiescence to avoid a costly lawsuit.

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Antioch approves $27 million water rights settlement – California

The state has agreed to pay Antioch $27 million in a settlement that guarantees the city’s 150-year old rights to pump water from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta for the long term and will help pay for a planned desalination plant.

In return, the city will ditch a provision in a 1968 water rights deal that required the state to reimburse it for one-third of the cost to buy substitute water from the Contra Costa Water District when the Delta water gets too salty, which has been occurred more frequently in recent years.

The Antioch City Council on Tuesday unanimously approved the settlement from the lawsuit it filed in 2017 against the California Department of Water Resources.

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12-Hour Shifts, Sleeping in RVs: Carlsbad Desalination Plant Gets New Crew – California

A 10-person crew is in the midst of a three-week shelter-in-place shift at the Claude “Bud” Lewis Carlsbad Desalination Plant, relieving an initial crew that self-quarantined on site for three weeks to continue producing clean drinking water for county residents amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Starting March 19, the first crew of 10 “mission-critical employees” was stationed at the plant to continue operations, working two 12-hour shifts each day and sleeping in RVs in the plant parking lot, according to Poseidon Water, which manages the plant. Food and other supplies were delivered on a daily basis.

The crew was relieved last Thursday and the current crew will remain at the plant until April 30.

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Antioch to receive $27 million settlement from California’s Department of Water Resources – California

On April 14th, the Antioch City Council will consider the adoption of a resolution approving a historic settlement agreement between the City and California Department of Water Resources (DWR).

The agreement pays Antioch $27 million, which guarantees that they will be able to utilize its 150-year old water rights and remain in the Delta for the long-term. 

The $27 million, in addition to $43 million in State grants and loans, completes the financing for the $70 million brackish water desalination plant.

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Carlsbad desalination plant running at full capacity with ‘shelter in place’ – California

When your business is water, your business is essential. Over at the Desalination Plant in Carlsbad, it’s anything but business as usual.

“We’ve had 10 people on the job for about 21 days. Each one of those people is a specialist and volunteered to be here. We’re doing something unique. We’ve brought in separate trailers for each one of the workers and groceries are delivered every couple days.

We also have washer and dryers so they can wash their clothes,” says Jessica Jones of Poseidon Water.

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Unsung Heroes: Carlsbad’s desalination plant workers – California

The Carlsbad Desalination Plant turns seawater into clean safe drinking water.

In an effort to keep delivering 50 million gallons of fresh water to the county daily the plant has gone on complete lockdown.As of March 19, 10 workers volunteered to quarantine themselves inside the Carlsbad plant for the next three weeks.

The company said workers will continue to monitor and adjust gauges and switches, watching for leaks – doing whatever is needed to safeguard San Diego County’s only significant local source of drinking water.

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Water & Wastewater Workers Considered Essential During COVID-19 Outbreak – California

10 workers are quarantined inside the Claude Lewis Carlsbad Desalination Plant in Carlsbad, California for the next three weeks. 

The workers are monitoring and adjusting gauges and switches, watching for leaks, and completing other tasks needed to safeguard San Diego County’s only significant local source of drinking water. All 10 volunteered themselves. The Carlsbad plant is home to 40 employees overall, reported the San Diego Tribune.

The request for volunteers was a precaution against the spread of COVID-19, reported the San Diego Tribune.

(LINK).

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