Oman

New initiative to strengthen water desalination sector in Oman – Oman

France-headquartered resource management specialist, Veolia, has joined forces with Oman’s Sembcorp Salalah Power and Water Company, and Sohar Operation Services, to launch an apprenticeship initiative aimed at elevating the quality of talent entering Oman’s desalination sector.

The nine-month programme will include theoretical learning within a classroom environment as well as on-the-job training for Omani mechanical and electrical engineering graduates from the Sultan Qaboos University and the Salalah Technology College.

The apprenticeship programme is certified by the Ministry of Manpower in Oman and is based upon the National Vocational Qualification (NVQ) Level 4, which is UK’s work-based qualification that tests candidates on their knowledge and skills for technical and professional work-related activities.

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MEDRC and USAID announces desalination innovation drive – Oman

In partnership with USAID, MEDRC has launched an international call for research proposals in a bid to spur innovation in small scale desalination technologies.

To engage the broadest possible community of researchers and innovators from across the world, MEDRC’s desalination innovation strategy has two approaches – an innovation inducement prize called the ‘Oman Humanitarian Desalination Challenge’ carrying a $700,000 cash prize, and the international research call announced today with support from USAID.

The Oman Humanitarian Desalination Challenge Prize is a joint initiative led by MEDRC and The Research Council (TRC) with funding provided by the Sultan Qaboos Higher Centre for Culture and Science. The $700,000 USD cash prize will be awarded to the team or person that delivers a hand-held, low-cost, off-grid desalination device that can be rapidly deployed in the aftermath of a humanitarian crisis.

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Oman Humanitarian Desalination Challenge 2020 kicks off – Oman

MUSCAT, FEB 23 – MEDRC announced on Sunday the opening of team registration for this year’s Oman Humanitarian Desalination Challenge Prize Competition.

The Competition is a global water prize that looks to award $700,000 to the person or team that can invent a small, cheap and easy to use desalination device that would enable people in emergency situations to single handedly purify salty or contaminated water to a safe drinking standard.

Today’s announcement comes after MEDRC has completed the screening process for all of the 2019 entries and officially declared that no winning device has been found.

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In the Middle East, countries spend heavily to transform seawater into drinking water – Oman

The pipes work like powerful straws, sucking in seawater and sending it through a series of tanks and filters. The Barka 4 desalination plant is Oman’s newest and largest.

Powered by natural gas, the plant went online last year and at full capacity can churn out 74 million gallons of potable water in a day — enough to fill 112 Olympic-size swimming pools.  

Oman relies on desalination because its extreme scarcity of water leaves few other options. In this corner of the Arabian Peninsula, there isn’t a single river that flows year-round, and pumping from wells has led to depleted aquifers and allowed saltwater to seep into groundwater along the coast.

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Water-scarce Gulf countries bank on desalination, at a cost – Oman

SUR: “We have water, and it’s the most important thing in a house,” says Abdullah Al-Harthi from the port city of Sur in Oman, a country that relies on desalination plants.

But for Oman and the other Gulf countries dominated by vast and scorching deserts, obtaining fresh water from the sea comes at a high financial and environmental cost.

In Sur, south of the capital Muscat, water for residents and businesses comes from a large desalination plant that serves some 600,000 people. “Before, life was very difficult. We had wells, and water was delivered by trucks,” the 58-year-old said. “Since the 1990s, water has come through pipes and we’ve had no cuts.”

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Oman’s second biggest water project launched – Oman

A huge water desalination plant, with a production capacity of around 250,000 cubic metres (m3) per day, has been brought into operation at Sohar Port.

The Suhar-4 Independent Water Project (IWP), built with an investment of around $220 million, reinforces Suhar’s importance as Oman’s biggest seawater desalination hub designed to meet the escalating potable water requirements of vast swathes of the Batinah and other grid-connected parts of north Oman.

Last week, Spanish water giant Sacyr — the lead investor in the Suhar-4 IWP — said the reverse osmosis (RO) based desalination plant, located within Sohar Port, is now fully operational.

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Sacyr Starts Operations at the Desalination Plant in Sohar – Oman

acyr through its affiliates Sacyr Sadyt and Sacyr Agua has started operations at the seawater desalination plant in Sohar, on the Al Batinah coast. With an investment of nearly EUR 200 million, the revenue backlog estimated for 20 years of operation totals EUR 1 billion.

The reverse-osmosis desalination plant is the second-largest in the country and has the capacity to produce 250,000 m3 of water per day, supplying around 220,000 people.

The public company Oman Power and Water Procurement Company awarded the bid for the Sohar 4 IWP desalination plant to the consortium led by Sacyr Agua (51%), and in which Oman Brunei Investment Company (25%) and Sogex Oman (24%) are also participating, through the Water Purchase Agreement – WPA. The WPA includes the design, construction, ownership, financing, operation, maintenance and purchase of potable water for 20 years.

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78 million m³ of potable water unaccounted for last year – Oman

An estimated 78.6 million cubic metres of potable water, representing 21.6 per cent of the total output of desalinated and groundwater handled by Oman’s Public Authority for Water (Diam), remained unaccounted for in 2018.

Unaccounted for Water (UFW) —typically attributed to leaks in underground pipeline systems, metering errors and unbilled metres — represents a significant share of Diam’s revenues and is the subject of intensive mitigation efforts.

Those efforts helped bring down water losses linked to UFW from 24.3 per cent (equivalent to 98.3 million cubic metres) in 2017 to 21.6 per cent last year, according to Diam’s Executive Chairman, Mohammed bin Abdullah al Mahrouqi.

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Spanish firm Abengoa delivers key power transmission project for Oman’s OETC- Oman

Abengoa, a Spanish-based international firm specialising in infrastructure, energy and water projects, has announced the successful completion of a major electricity transmission project in the Sultanate.

The client is Oman Electricity Transmission Company (OETC), the state-owned utility part of Nama Group that oversees the operation of the nations two main grids in the north and south of the country.

Abengoa developed the construction, supply, assembly and commissioning of two new substations of 132/33 kV, one in Samad and one in Sinaw, and more than 60 km of overhead transmission lines of 132 kV associated with them, whose main technical challenge was to cross the mountainous areas of the interior of Oman.

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Renewables to preclude need for new gas-based power projects in Oman – Oman

Going by expected power demand growth trends, any demand for new generation capacity will be met almost exclusively by renewables over the next seven years, precluding the need for any new gas-based Independent Power Projects (IPPs) during this timeframe.

This paradigm shift in Omans power generation space underscores the ambitious role envisaged for renewables chiefly solar photovoltaic capacity in the nations energy mix, according to an official of Oman Power and Water Procurement Company (OPWP), the sole procurer of electricity generation and related water desalination capacity under the sector law.

More than 11 per cent of power supply will come from renewable energy by 2023, rising to between 25-30 per cent by 2030, said Bushra al Maskari, Planning Director OPWP. Even globally, moving from zero per cent to 30 per cent in less than a decade is astounding, she remarked in a presentation on energy trends at a forum held in the city recently.

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