Oman

Why thirsty Arab region needs sustainable desalination tech – Oman

A desalination plant in the Omani port city of Sur, south of the capital Muscat.

Water for residents and businesses from the plant improves the quality of life for some 600,000 people. A desalination plant in the Omani port city of Sur, south of the capital Muscat.

Water for residents and businesses from the plant improves the quality of life for some 600,000 people.

Assets of Oman’s Tanweer surge 26pc to RO 533m in 2019 – Oman

The Rural Areas Electricity Company (Tamweer), a subsidiary of The Electricity Holding Company (Nama Group), has reported an impressive 26 percent growth in the value of its nationwide assets, which rose to RO 533 million at the end of 2019, up from RO 422 million a year earlier.

It underscores wholly-government-owned Tanweer’s increasingly important role as the sole provider of electricity and potable water to vast swathes of the Sultanate that lie far beyond the coverage of the nation’s main power and water grids.

Included in the company’s jurisdiction are the governorates of Musandam and Al Wusta, parts of Al Dakhiliyah and South Al Sharqiyah, and much of Dhofar – aggregating around 73 per cent of the land area of the country.

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Oman pulls quick u-turn on desalination payments – Oman

Oman has moved to reassure private water and power producers that they will still get paid in full, a week after the country’s central offtaker shocked companies by saying it would not be meeting its bills.

At the start of last week, it emerged that the 11 private companies that supply just under 1.5 million m3/d of water in the Sultanate had been told by the Oman Power and Water Procurement Company (OPWP) that there would be a “hold back” of power and water capacity investment payments from April invoices onwards.

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Veolia Oman mobilises to maintain water, waste services – Oman

Since the beginning of the crisis, global water solutions specialist Veolia has put in place business continuity plans specific to each country that focus primarily on producing and supplying drinking water and treating wastewater, preserving waste collection operation, safeguarding energy management activities in cooling networks, performing industrial on-site services to ensure industrial continue to operate and upholding its activities processing hazardous waste, which is vital to maintaining key industrial operations.

In Oman, the men and women of Veolia who are highly experienced in managing crisis, draw on the Group’s solid organisation and tried and tested methods to carry out duties, even in the most difficult and critical conditions.

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AIIB in lending syndicate to Oman solar power project – Oman

THE Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) is amongst the lenders on the 500MW Ibri II solar power project in Oman.

Last week lead sponsor ACWA Power of Saudi Arabia announced that it had reached financial close on the project, via a US$275 million senior debt facility with a maturity of 16.5 years.

The six mandated lead banks are AIIB, Standard Chartered Bank, Bank Muscat, Riyad Bank, Siemens Bank, and Warba Bank. AIIB is providing US$60 million.

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New initiative to strengthen water desalination sector in Oman – Oman

France-headquartered resource management specialist, Veolia, has joined forces with Oman’s Sembcorp Salalah Power and Water Company, and Sohar Operation Services, to launch an apprenticeship initiative aimed at elevating the quality of talent entering Oman’s desalination sector.

The nine-month programme will include theoretical learning within a classroom environment as well as on-the-job training for Omani mechanical and electrical engineering graduates from the Sultan Qaboos University and the Salalah Technology College.

The apprenticeship programme is certified by the Ministry of Manpower in Oman and is based upon the National Vocational Qualification (NVQ) Level 4, which is UK’s work-based qualification that tests candidates on their knowledge and skills for technical and professional work-related activities.

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MEDRC and USAID announces desalination innovation drive – Oman

In partnership with USAID, MEDRC has launched an international call for research proposals in a bid to spur innovation in small scale desalination technologies.

To engage the broadest possible community of researchers and innovators from across the world, MEDRC’s desalination innovation strategy has two approaches – an innovation inducement prize called the ‘Oman Humanitarian Desalination Challenge’ carrying a $700,000 cash prize, and the international research call announced today with support from USAID.

The Oman Humanitarian Desalination Challenge Prize is a joint initiative led by MEDRC and The Research Council (TRC) with funding provided by the Sultan Qaboos Higher Centre for Culture and Science. The $700,000 USD cash prize will be awarded to the team or person that delivers a hand-held, low-cost, off-grid desalination device that can be rapidly deployed in the aftermath of a humanitarian crisis.

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Oman Humanitarian Desalination Challenge 2020 kicks off – Oman

MUSCAT, FEB 23 – MEDRC announced on Sunday the opening of team registration for this year’s Oman Humanitarian Desalination Challenge Prize Competition.

The Competition is a global water prize that looks to award $700,000 to the person or team that can invent a small, cheap and easy to use desalination device that would enable people in emergency situations to single handedly purify salty or contaminated water to a safe drinking standard.

Today’s announcement comes after MEDRC has completed the screening process for all of the 2019 entries and officially declared that no winning device has been found.

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In the Middle East, countries spend heavily to transform seawater into drinking water – Oman

The pipes work like powerful straws, sucking in seawater and sending it through a series of tanks and filters. The Barka 4 desalination plant is Oman’s newest and largest.

Powered by natural gas, the plant went online last year and at full capacity can churn out 74 million gallons of potable water in a day — enough to fill 112 Olympic-size swimming pools.  

Oman relies on desalination because its extreme scarcity of water leaves few other options. In this corner of the Arabian Peninsula, there isn’t a single river that flows year-round, and pumping from wells has led to depleted aquifers and allowed saltwater to seep into groundwater along the coast.

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Water-scarce Gulf countries bank on desalination, at a cost – Oman

SUR: “We have water, and it’s the most important thing in a house,” says Abdullah Al-Harthi from the port city of Sur in Oman, a country that relies on desalination plants.

But for Oman and the other Gulf countries dominated by vast and scorching deserts, obtaining fresh water from the sea comes at a high financial and environmental cost.

In Sur, south of the capital Muscat, water for residents and businesses comes from a large desalination plant that serves some 600,000 people. “Before, life was very difficult. We had wells, and water was delivered by trucks,” the 58-year-old said. “Since the 1990s, water has come through pipes and we’ve had no cuts.”

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