Kenya

Kenya Installs the First Solar Plant That Transforms Ocean Water Into Drinking Water – Kenya

Water should not be luxury product, but still in these modern times, one out of nine people doesn’t have access to clean drinking water.

This main issue here is that only around 4% of earth’s water sources are rivers, lakes and drinkable water, the rest is comprised of oceans with salty water.

These are all alarming statistics, but luckily in many such places around the world things are starting to improve thanks to new technologies.

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A new solar desalination system to address water scarcity – Kenya

GivePower is launching containerized, solar-powered water desalination and purification plants in Mombasa, Kenya and La Gonave, Haiti this quarter.

Like GivePower’s debut solar-powered microgrid desalination plant, which went live in Kiunga, Kenya in 2018, these new projects will operate with Tesla’s powerwall battery storage technology.

At launch, both of the nonprofit’s new solar water farm projects will produce a maximum of 75,000 liters of water a day by coupling a 50-kW solar system with 120 kW-hrs of Tesla batteries; together this solar plus battery system will power two low-wattage, reverse osmosis desalination pumps that run simultaneously to ensure continuous operation.

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Mombasa: grand plans that never happened – Kenya

When Mombasa Governor Hassan Joho was sworn in for his final term in office, top in his priority list was the implementation of major projects that were part of the county’s Vision 2035 plan.

He had initiated the projects in 2016 during his first term. Now, with only two years left before he leaves office, the projects exist only on paper.

Some of the projects that were meant to spur economic growth in the county included the establishment of a Sh6.5 billion waste recycling plant, construction of desalination plants at a cost of Sh16 billion, development of a Sh200 billion housing project and the introduction of a Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system. The four are part of the county’s urban re-development plan.

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Kenyan village installs solar PV desalination plant – Kenya

The system is situated in close proximity to the Indian Ocean in the village of Kiunga on the Eastern coast of Kenya. It is a region which has seen extreme drought for many years and denying the 3,500 residents access to hygienic drinking water, Construction Review Online reported.

The project has been headed up by the non-governmental organisation, Give Power.

Construction Review Online further reported that the system will harvest enough solar energy to produce 50 kilowatts of energy and power for two water pumps that run 24 hours a day and it turns salty water safely into drinkable water.

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Tesla batteries help power new solar water desalination plant in Africa – Kenya

GivePower has deployed a new water desalination plant in Africa using Tesla batteries and solar power that is now providing clean water to thousands of people.

The system has been deployed in Kiunga, a rural village in Kenya where the lack of clean water had people sometimes rely on saltwater wells or even contaminated water.

Desalination is a power-consuming process that is hard to implement in a place where power is already scarce.

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Relief as Mtongwe gets solar-powered desalination plant – Kenya

Mtongwe residents can now smile all the way to their kitchens, drink fresh water and kiss their acute water shortage problems goodbye. 

This is after a charitable organisation installed a solar-powered water desalination plant in the area which has been experiencing frequent water shortages forcing residents to travel long distances to fetch salty water.

The plant, installed by Bilal Muslim Mission of Kenya with the support of Borea Light GmbH and the Irene and Friedrich Vorwerk Foundation, can desalinate 2,000 litres per hour and up to 20,000 litres per day.

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After Five Years of Drought, Kenyan Region Finally Gets Clean Water Thanks to Solar-Powered Saltwater Plant – Kenya

For the last five years, this Kenyan region has been suffering from debilitating drought—but they have finally been given the gift of clean water thanks to a new solar-powered desalination plant.

Prior to the plant’s launch in the town of Kiunga, villagers had completely run out of clean drinking water and had instead resorted to using dirty well-water and saltwater from the Indian Ocean.

Now, the solar water farm produces enough clean drinking water for more than 35,000 people every day. Not only that, the water has been shown to be even cleaner than typical desalination plants.

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Solar-powered water farm opens in Kenya – Kenya

Spotted: The people living in the Kenyan fishing village of Kiunga have been forced to drink, cook and bathe in contaminated, brackish water for years. Last year, NGO GivePower installed a solar water farm in the village.

The desalination system now provides clean water to all of the village’s 3500 residents, at a cost of around $20 per person.

Kiunga’s location along the coast makes it an ideal site for the desalination farm. Housed in 20-foot shipping containers, it is portable, and its solar panels produce 50 kilowatts of energy – enough to power two water pumps.

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Kenya turns to Saudi investor to make water drinkable in arid Turkana region – Kenya

Authorities in Kenya’s driest region are in talks with a Saudi investor to build a desalination plant, after hopes of finding drinking water from an aquifer were dashed.

Tito Ochieng, the director of water services in Turkana, in the north of the country, said the potential investor – Saudi-owned Almar Water – has already signed a deal to build a $160m (£125m) desalination plant in Mombasa.

According to Ochieng, the plant would be built on top of the Lotikipi aquifer, in the village of Nanam, and is expected to cost 5–10bn Kenyan shilling (£37.5–75m).

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A solar-powered system can turn salt water into fresh drinking water for 25,000 people per day – Kenya

People have been trying to turn seawater into drinking water for thousands of years, but the process is not usually energy-efficient or affordable.

At a newly constructed facility in Kenya, however, a nonprofit called GivePower is tackling that challenge using solar power.

The desalination system, which started operating in the coastal area of Kiunga in July 2018, can create 19,800 gallons (75,000 litres) of fresh drinking water each day – enough for 25,000 people.

(LINK).

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