India

Chennai takes new strides towards water security – India

After undergoing one of the worst water crisis in its history, Chennai bounced back to come up with milestone projects that could make the city water secure in the long run.

With the four major reservoirs that supply drinking water to Chennai going bone dry and deficit rains during 2018, the city’s water supply was reduced 525 million litres a day (mld). It was one of the first Indian cities to run dry early this year.

As taps stopped flowing and water became a premier commodity, residents looked deeper into the ground and sunk borewells up to a depth of 600 feet. In June, the average groundwater table in the city declined by a staggering nine metres.

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Foundation stone laid for 100 MLD desalination plant – India

Gujarat Chief Minister Vijay Rupani laid the foundation stone for the country’s first desalination plant having a capacity of 100 MLD at Dahej Petroleum, Chemicals and Petrochemicals Investment Region (PCPIR) in Bharuch district on 30 November 2019.

The plant is estimated to entail an investment of Rs 881 crore. The water from the plant will be supplied to industries in Dahej. Eight desalination plants will come up in Gujarat where sea water will be converted and made fit for industries, agriculture and drinking purpose. The plant will be operational in the next 30 months.

The quality of water supplied from the plant will be like the one of Narmada river. Under the present state water supply scheme, industries in Dahej get 454 MLD water daily.The quality of water supplied from the plant will be like the one of Narmada river. Under the present state water supply scheme, industries in Dahej get 454 MLD water daily.

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Work on a third desalination plant in Nemmeli to begin by October-end – Asia

Work on constructing a third desalination plant at Nemmeli, along East Coast Road, is set to begin by the month-end.

The new plant, with a capacity to treat 150 million litres of sea water a day (mld), will come up on a 10.5-acre space on the same premises as the earlier 100-mld plant.

Metrowater officials said materials had been sought for the work to commence. The new plant too will employ the reverse osmosis process. But it will have additional components in the pre-treatment process such as dissolved air flotation and ultra filtration, to keep out sea algae and other particles in seawater from hindering the production process.

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India’s ‘grave’ water crisis a result of misallocation, mispricing, mismanagement – India

According to NITI (of Government of India) Report (June 2018), India is now entering in to the phase of “acute water scarcity” and if no adequate measures are taken, then the water demand would exceed water supply by the year 2030.

Also, the ground water resources in many cities including Delhi, Chennai, Bengaluru would get exhausted. Water stress is rapidly turning in to water crisis. Water availability on the earth remains the same as it was 5000 years ago when mankind population was just 5 million as against present population of 7700 million.

However, “there is enough water for everyone’s need but not enough for anyone’s greed”, as pointed out by Gandhiji who was also not in favour of “putting too much burden on the resources (including water) provided to us by nature”.

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Centre mulling tapping wind power at low cost, says Nitin Gadkari – Hyderabad

Union Minister for Road Transport, Highways and Shipping Nitin Gadkari has said that the Central government proposes to generate wind power from Tuticorin, Kandla and Paradip ports. 

The plan includes establishing desalination plants at the three ports to solve the drinking water problem besides producing power at a rate of Rs 2.5 per unit, he said. He was speaking at the 34th annual convocation of Vellore Institute of Technology (VIT) at Vellore on Saturday.

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Chennai’s wettest day of year brings 21 days of water – India

After playing hide and seek for the last few days, the clouds over Chennai and adjoining areas opened up late on Wednesday night, dumping 10.4cm of rain, making it the wettest day of the year. The city last recorded 10cm rain in a 24-hour period on August 25, 2011.

For hydrogeologists, the record means that the core city with an area of 174sqkm has received about 17,400 million litres of water which would serve the city’s water supply needs for 21 days, assuming every drop of rain is saved.

But does the city have adequate infrastructure to harvest rainwater?

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Over Rs 6k crore sanctioned for Perur desalination plant – India

The State government has sanctioned Rs 6,079 crore for establishing a 400-MLD reverse osmosis desalination plant at Perur on the East Coast Road, according to the GO issued by the Municipal Administration Department last week.

The funds were sanctioned to give effect to the recent announcement made by Chief Minister Edappadi K Palaniswami under Rule 110 in the Assembly.  The plant, being set up to meet the increasing water demands in Chennai city, is funded by the Japan International Cooperation Agency.

The JICA will give Rs 4,267.70 crore in two tranches – i.e., Rs 1,744.40 crore as Transche-I and the balance as Tranche-II. The operation and maintenance cost for 20 years is estimated at Rs 20,174.14 crore and the land lease cost at Rs 82 crore for 30 years; that is, Rs 1,000 crore per annum, on an average.

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Chennai’s wait for Krishna river water gets longer – India

Krishna’s water supply to Chennai remains as elusive as ever, as it will take 10-15 days for the city to start receiving its share, said officials from the Water Resource Department (WRD).Though the two main reservoirs across Krishna river in Andhra Pradesh, Srisailam and Somasila, have crossed the mark of transferrable water levels, the third reservoir, Kandaleru is still not full.

As on Wednesday, Kandaleru had stored 3.6 thousand million cubic feet (tmcft) of water while 6.4 tmcft is needed to transfer water to the city.

Officials said 6,000 cusecs of water is currently being routed from Somasila to Kandaleru reservoir.

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‘Setting up desal plants a must to meet water requirement’ – India

The Puducherry government has no option other than to set up desalination plants to meet the demand for water in the Union territory of Puducherry in the future, said chief minister V Narayanasamy.

Replying to a query raised by a member in the legislative assembly on Wednesday, Narayanasamy said the government will seek financial assistance from a French agency to execute projects including desalination plants to meet the growing drinking water needs of the residents.

He said the government has proposed to make rainwater harvesting structures mandatory in every household in the territory.

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How the business of water scarcity can be tackled in India – India

After almost a week of highlighting solutions to mitigate an increasingly water scarce future, the World Water Week will draw to a close in Stockholm Saturday.

Pushing for inclusivity and investing in sustainable technology were among the key themes of WWW 2019, organised by the Stockholm International Water Institute.

These ideas will also be key investor solutions to addressing the water challenge in India — one of the 17 countries facing severe water stress, according to the World Resources Institute.

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