India

Chennai’s 3rd desalination plant to be launched next week – Chennai

In about two years, Chennai will get water from its third desalination plant.

The project, that will supply 150 million litres a day, is likely to be launched in Nemmeli on Thursday, Metrowater officials said. The plant will cater to residents of several areas, including Velachery, Palavakkam and Perungudi.

In addition to this, for establishing the fourth desalination plant in Perur, that will supply 400 mld to the city, Metrowater has set the ball rolling after a lot of delay.

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Water to be ferried to Chennai by train from Jolarpet, says CM Palaniswami – Chennai

Chennai: Water starved Chennai is all set to get some relief as Tamil Nadu Chief Minister K Palaniswami Friday said 10 million litres would be transported from Jolarpet in Vellore district by train to augment supply.

This initiative will be carried on for six months and Rs 65 crore has been set apart for the purpose, he said. Chennai Metropolitan Water Supply and Sewerage Board has been allocated Rs 158.42 crore for water distribution here, he said.

Chennai Metropolitan Water Supply and Sewerage Board has been allocated Rs 158.42 crore for water distribution here, he said.

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Tamil Nadu reels under water crisis, IT firms and hotels in Chennai severely hit by shortage – Chennai

Tamil Nadu and its capital Chennai are faced with an acute water crisis that has triggered instances of violence and has forced establishments to find new ways to conserve water.

The Porur Lake in Chennai, which is considered one of the main sources of water for the city, is almost at its lowest ever level and the Chennai Metropolitan Water Supply and Sewerage Board is now banking on water from desalination plants and stone quarries in Kanchipuram district, India Today had reported.

The water crisis has affected almost every sector, including information technology, hospitals and restaurants. Some IT companies in Chennai have asked employees to work from home, The News Minute reported last week.

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India and Israel join hands to develop solutions to desertification and living in the desert – India

“As part of our growing partnership with India, Israel is keen to work together and share all its experience and cutting edge technology in our joint fight against desertification, including a strategic partnership on water management and water security,” said Dr Malka.

Israel has been working in depth in the field of desert technologies and methods of dealing with desertification.

With over 60 per cent of its territory being a desert and another 20 per cent semi-arid land, Israel has been working to develop solutions to desertification and living in the desert, including: desert agriculture, irrigation, desalination, aquaculture, afforestation and management of water resources.

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Madras HC pulls up TN govt over water crisis, asks for report on measures taken – India

Even as the state of Tamil Nadu is in the throes of a severe water crisis, the Madras High Court has pulled up the state government on measures it has taken. The state government has been directed to file a report on how it has addressed the issue by June 17. 

According to a report in The Hindu, the court was hearing cases filed against the commercial exploitation of groundwater from the outskirts of the city. In particular, one public interest litigation (PIL) from a resident of Vellore district had alleged that sewage was being allowed to flow through into a water channel.

A division bench of Justice S Manikumar and Justice Subramonium Prasad also sought details of the number of sewage treatment plants (STPs) present. 

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Tamil Nadu to approach A.P. for Krishna water – Chennai

The Tamil Nadu government is likely to approach Andhra Pradesh for seeking its share of Krishna water as soon as the latter starts getting heavy inflows in its reservoirs after the southwest monsoon progresses.

The availability of Krishna water has become critical to Chennai, which is in the midst of an acute water shortage. Even though Chennai Metro Water Supply and Sewerage Board is making efforts to tap every conceivable source, this will, at best, sustain the water supply of around 500 million litres a day (MLD).

Without Krishna water, the supply cannot be restored to the normal level of 830 MLD – 850 MLD.

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Running dry: Competing for water on a thirsty planet – India

In India’s ‘Silicon Valley’ tech hub of Bangalore, where gleaming office complexes and apartment blocks have sprouted faster than the plumbing to serve them, only 60% of the water the city needs each day arrives through its water pipes.

Much of the rest is pumped from groundwater wells and delivered to homes and offices by a fleet of private and government tanker trucks that growl through the streets of the city of 12 million.

But Bangalore’s groundwater is running dry. A government think tank last year predicted the city – like others in India, including New Delhi – could run out of usable groundwater as early as 2020 as aquifers deplete.

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Mini-desalination plants to quench thirst of 5 lakh Chennai residents soon – Chennai

CHENNAI: Faced with the onerous task of quenching the thirst of a city that’s being whittled down by a rising population and failing rain, the government has unveiled a plan to set up five mini-desalination plants of one million litre capacity each.

The plants, costing Rs120 crore, will start operation at Kasimedu, Thiruvottiyur, Triplicane, MRC Nagar and Thiruvanmiyur within the next six months, said a Chennai Water Supply and Sewerage Board proposal.

“Everyone knows Chennai is facing a water crisis. Since we lack perennial sources, we decided to set up minidesalination plants that will cater to specific areas.

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Chennai: Acute water shortage puts hotels in crisis control mode – Chennai

CHENNAI: Acute water shortage has affected the hospitality industry, with hotels welcoming guests with caution notice and restaurants replacing plates with plantain leaves. Being one of the largest water guzzling sectors, hotels and restaurants largely depend on private tankers for sourcing water.

While the hospitality industry has taken contingency measures to tackle the looming crisis, hotel associations are raising concern over a possible shutdown if tankers cut down the supply. South India Hotels and Restaurants Association (SIHRA) secretary T Natarajan said that hotels urge guests to conserve water.

“In the welcome letters, we appeal to our guests to be prudent over water usage in the light of prevailing water shortage. So far, private water tankers have been supplying water — at a huge cost,” he said.

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Mumbai faces fourth water cut of 10 per cent in a decade – Mumbai

This summer, Mumbai faces a water cut of 10 per cent, its fourth in a decade. The average rainfall that Mumbai receives every year has been steadily dropping. In 2008, we received 2,508 mm of water. Last year, that figure dropped to 2,009.45 mm.

It wasn’t sufficient to fill to capacity the seven lakes which store the water supplied to the city. Until May 9, the lake levels had only 15 per cent of live stock water — 2,21,265 million litres. An additional 1,70,000 million litres is in reserve which the state government has allowed us to use.

Yet, this situation could have been avoided if only the BMC and the state government had implemented their own plans. In 2008, the then state government had considered setting up desalination plants in the city. However, nothing was done.

In 2016 — after the current government appointed a high power committee to look at the feasibility of the project — the plan was struck down owing to high costs and huge land usage.

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