China

System achieves new level of efficiency in harnessing sunlight to make fresh potable water from seawater – Cambridge

A completely passive solar-powered desalination system developed by researchers at MIT and in China could provide more than 1.5 gallons of fresh drinking water per hour for every square meter of solar collecting area.

Such systems could potentially serve off-grid arid coastal areas to provide an efficient, low-cost water source.

The system uses multiple layers of flat solar evaporators and condensers, lined up in a vertical array and topped with transparent aerogel insulation. It is described in a paper appearing today in the journal Energy and Environmental Science, authored by MIT doctoral students Lenan Zhang and Lin Zhao, postdoc Zhenyuan Xu, professor of mechanical engineering and department head Evelyn Wang, and eight others at MIT and at Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China.

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New solar-powered system makes desalination ecofriendly – America

A completely passive solar-powered desalination system developed by researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and in China could provide more than 1.5 gallons of fresh drinking water per hour for every square metre of solar collecting area. 

Such systems could potentially serve off-grid arid coastal areas to provide an efficient, low-cost water source, said MIT doctoral students in a paper appearing in the journal ‘Energy and Environmental Science’.

The key to the system’s efficiency lies in the way it uses each of the multiple stages to desalinate the water. At each stage, heat released by the previous stage is harnessed instead of wasted. In this way, the team’s demonstration device can achieve an overall efficiency of 385 percent in converting the energy of sunlight into the energy of water evaporation.

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Solar-powered desalination systems could bring water to disaster zones – Shanghai

It’s one of life’s most frustrating ironies that Earth’s surface is over 70 percent water, but most of that is undrinkable. Desalination is an important technology that may help unlock more drinking water, and now two independent teams have developed new types of solar-powered desalination systems using very different mechanisms.

The first of the two new designs comes from researchers at MIT and Shanghai Jiao Tong University. The team says the multilayer system has an impressive overall efficiency of 385 percent, producing as much as 5.78 L (1.52 gallons) of clean water per square meter of solar-collecting area, which is more than twice the amount produced by similar systems.

Each of the layers, arranged vertically, has an important role to play in the process. First, there’s a transparent insulating layer that lets sunlight through to a black, heat-absorbing layer. That in turn passes the heat onto several layers of wicking material, which have sucked the water up from below. The water evaporates out of that layer and strikes another surface, where it condenses and drips off to be collected.

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Scientists create simple, solar-powered water desalination – China

A completely passive solar-powered desalination system could provide more than 1.5 gallons of fresh drinking water per hour for every square meter of solar collecting area.

Such systems could potentially serve off-grid arid coastal areas to provide an efficient, low-cost water source.

The system uses multiple layers of flat solar evaporators and condensers, lined up in a vertical array and topped with transparent aerogel insulation.

(LINK).

Simple, solar-powered water desalination – China

A completely passive solar-powered desalination system developed by researchers at MIT and in China could provide more than 1.5 gallons of fresh drinking water per hour for every square meter of solar collecting area. Such systems could potentially serve off-grid arid coastal areas to provide an efficient, low-cost water source.

The system uses multiple layers of flat solar evaporators and condensers, lined up in a vertical array and topped with transparent aerogel insulation. It is described in a paper appearing today in the journal Energy and Environmental Science, authored by MIT doctoral students Lenan Zhang and Lin Zhao, postdoc Zhenyuan Xu, professor of mechanical engineering and department head Evelyn Wang, and eight others at MIT and at Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China.

(LINK).

Hyflux unit restructures $121.3m loan for desalination plant in China – China

Hyflux said its wholly-owned unit Tianjin Dagang Newspring Co Ltd (TDN) has successfully restructured a 617 million yuan (S$121.3 million) Bank of China loan.

The loan’s maturity date has been extended by three years to 2026, with the repayment schedule adjusted for lower annual repayments.

The loan is for TDN’s 100,000 cubic metre per day seawater desalination plant in Dagang City, Tianjin Province, and is guaranteed by Hyflux.

(LINK).

Chinese tech giant Huawei enters into Israeli solar energy market – China

Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei Technologies announced its entry into the Israeli solar energy market on Wednesday, one day after confirming the closure of its solar operations in the United States.

Huawei, the world’s leading inverter supplier, has signed an agreement with Zing Energy – which represents the Chinese company in Israel – to install solar inverters in several 30-megawatt solar farm projects across the country.

 Solar inverters are a critical instrument for the conversion of DC power produced by solar panels into AC power, suitable for the electric grid. 

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Toray to double production of water treatment membranes in China – China

Japanese materials manufacturer Toray Industries will build a new plant to make water treatment membranes in China, doubling its production capacity in a country facing water shortages.

The new plant is estimated to be a 10 billion yen ($89.7 million) investment, and will be built in Foshan, Guangdong Province.

It is to begin producing reverse osmosis membranes in 2021.

The high-performance membranes are in demand in China, where they are used to purify drinking water and to filter impurities from water for industrial use.

Northern China in particular has suffered chronic shortages, and securing clean water is considered crucial not just for daily living but to support economic growth.

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Sweet water for Vietnam – Vietnam

Aware of the importance of coping with effects of climate changes in agriculture production, a specialised Belgian engineering consultancy firm, Asian Infrastructure Engineering and Investment (AIEI) is partnering up with the Vietnamese government to expand green energy investments into the country.

AIEI is a sister company of the investment company Rent-A-Port, which is well-known for the development projects of DEEP C (Dinh Vu) Industrial Zones in Vietnam.

For the desalination mission, AIEI is collaborating with SCE, a company of Keran Group from France, enabling public and private parties to benefit from a global approach in development projects.

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Wind powered water desalination in coastal Vietnam – Vietnam

Climate change is happening and it is wreaking havoc by increasing temperatures, leading to salinity intrusion and floods. According to a report of Belgium’s Asian Infrastructure Engineering and Investment Company (AIEI), the total damage from salinity intrusion during the dry season and flood during the rainy season are estimated to reach 30 per cent of the total output of rice, vegetables, fruits, trees, and shrimp in 2050, equivalent to around VND3.6-12 trillion ($156.5-521.7 million).

Especially, over the last years, impoverished areas in coastal and south-central provinces have been facing salinisation, which is impacting production and life. Salinisation has entered about 35-40 kilometres into the Mekong River Delta, with the salinity level at around 14.6-31.2 grammes per litre, and especially, the Tien River has been salinised 90km inwards from the coast.

(LINK).

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