Chennai

Woes watered-down – India

CHENNAI: On Tuesday, CE reported that due to the lack of water supply in the tenements at Perumbakkam Resettlement Colony, a group of people including 50 women from the Colony stood outside the Tamil Nadu Slum Clearance Board (TNSCB), staging a protest, demanding basic needs including water. Soon, in response to the call of the residents, the TNSCB officials resumed water supply and told CE that they will ensure no further problem arises.

In line with the perennial water woes at the Resettlement Colony, the Slum Board officials have decided to soon increase the quantum of water being supplied to the tenements. In four months’ time, by when the construction of 14 more blocks will get over, the Slum Board officials said they will request the Metro Water Board to provide more water according to the needs.

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Chennai takes new strides towards water security – India

After undergoing one of the worst water crisis in its history, Chennai bounced back to come up with milestone projects that could make the city water secure in the long run.

With the four major reservoirs that supply drinking water to Chennai going bone dry and deficit rains during 2018, the city’s water supply was reduced 525 million litres a day (mld). It was one of the first Indian cities to run dry early this year.

As taps stopped flowing and water became a premier commodity, residents looked deeper into the ground and sunk borewells up to a depth of 600 feet. In June, the average groundwater table in the city declined by a staggering nine metres.

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Work on a third desalination plant in Nemmeli to begin by October-end – Asia

Work on constructing a third desalination plant at Nemmeli, along East Coast Road, is set to begin by the month-end.

The new plant, with a capacity to treat 150 million litres of sea water a day (mld), will come up on a 10.5-acre space on the same premises as the earlier 100-mld plant.

Metrowater officials said materials had been sought for the work to commence. The new plant too will employ the reverse osmosis process. But it will have additional components in the pre-treatment process such as dissolved air flotation and ultra filtration, to keep out sea algae and other particles in seawater from hindering the production process.

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Chennai’s wettest day of year brings 21 days of water – India

After playing hide and seek for the last few days, the clouds over Chennai and adjoining areas opened up late on Wednesday night, dumping 10.4cm of rain, making it the wettest day of the year. The city last recorded 10cm rain in a 24-hour period on August 25, 2011.

For hydrogeologists, the record means that the core city with an area of 174sqkm has received about 17,400 million litres of water which would serve the city’s water supply needs for 21 days, assuming every drop of rain is saved.

But does the city have adequate infrastructure to harvest rainwater?

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Over Rs 6k crore sanctioned for Perur desalination plant – India

The State government has sanctioned Rs 6,079 crore for establishing a 400-MLD reverse osmosis desalination plant at Perur on the East Coast Road, according to the GO issued by the Municipal Administration Department last week.

The funds were sanctioned to give effect to the recent announcement made by Chief Minister Edappadi K Palaniswami under Rule 110 in the Assembly.  The plant, being set up to meet the increasing water demands in Chennai city, is funded by the Japan International Cooperation Agency.

The JICA will give Rs 4,267.70 crore in two tranches – i.e., Rs 1,744.40 crore as Transche-I and the balance as Tranche-II. The operation and maintenance cost for 20 years is estimated at Rs 20,174.14 crore and the land lease cost at Rs 82 crore for 30 years; that is, Rs 1,000 crore per annum, on an average.

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Chennai’s wait for Krishna river water gets longer – India

Krishna’s water supply to Chennai remains as elusive as ever, as it will take 10-15 days for the city to start receiving its share, said officials from the Water Resource Department (WRD).Though the two main reservoirs across Krishna river in Andhra Pradesh, Srisailam and Somasila, have crossed the mark of transferrable water levels, the third reservoir, Kandaleru is still not full.

As on Wednesday, Kandaleru had stored 3.6 thousand million cubic feet (tmcft) of water while 6.4 tmcft is needed to transfer water to the city.

Officials said 6,000 cusecs of water is currently being routed from Somasila to Kandaleru reservoir.

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Four new 640MLD desal & RO plants will end Chennai’s water woes: Minister – India

CHENNAI: The Tamil Nadu government will ensure Chennai city has a permanent water supply capacity of 870 million litres a day (MLD) in the next five years by constructing two more desalination plants of 150 MLD and 400 MLD at Nemmeli and Perur and two 45 MLD tertiary treatment reverse osmosis plants, municipal administration minister S P Velumani announced on Friday.

Addressing the Times of India water conclave aimed at making Chennai water positive, the minister said 260 MLD of waste water would be recycled and diverted to industries to replace the potable water supplied now. Besides new sources such as the Thalakanacheri quarry, Nallambakkam quarry and Pulipakkam quarry with a potential of 60 MLD had been identified. The feasibility study for extraction of water from these sources was on.

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Niti working out proposal to set up desalination plants along coastline to tide over water crisis – India

The Niti Aayog is working on a proposal to set up a string of floating desalination plants in marine waters along the country’s over 7,500-km coastline, with a view to tide over the water crisis being faced in major urban centres of India.

Recently, several parts of the country, especially Chennai, faced severe water crisis, owing to poor storage in various reservoirs following deficit rainfall.

“The Niti Aayog is working on linking desalination of sea waters with the Sagarmala project,” a top government official told PTI on the condition of anonymity.

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Chennai industries to now use treated sewage water – India

CHENNAI: IN ten more days, Chennai will become the first Indian city to recycle sewage and supply it for industrial purposes.

A new treatment plant is being built in Kodungaiyur, which is likely to be completed by the first week of August.

This plant will supply recycled sewage water to industries, thereby ensuring that fresh drinking water is reserved for residential use. The move, Metro Water Board officials say, will help city tide over water crisis.

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Chennai records 56 per cent above normal rainfall, but little water in reservoirs – India

Chennai has recorded 56 per cent above normal rainfall since June 1, with 247.5 millimetres rainfall from June 1 to July 27.

Despite the good rains, Chennai’s reservoirs — Poondi, Cholavaram, Redhills and Chembarakkam — have not seen any significant improvement in water levels.

The combined storage at the four reservoirs stood at 16 Mcft against 1,734 Mcft last year.

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