Cape Town

No water restrictions: ‘City of Cape Town is not fully coming to the party’ – Cape Town

Cape Town – The City decided to lift water restrictions in Cape Town and to move to the lowest tariff, being the no-restriction, water-wise tariff from November 1.

The mayoral committee (mayco) unanimously supported the decision which will be presented before council for noting next week.

Mayor Dan Plato said: “Mayco has noted the expert advice from the City’s water and sanitation department and we support its decision to lift the water restrictions and to lower the water and sanitation tariff to the lowest approved level by council.

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Cape desalination plants take a final bow – Cape Town

The Monwabisi desalination plant is being decommissioned as the two-years period for which it was hired has to come to an end.

Decommissioning of its counterpart is Strandfontein already commenced in June this year, and is currently underway.

This city commissioned both the Monwabisi and Strandfontein temporary desalination plants to provide emergency water supply in the event that it was needed, as we faced the prospect of Day Zero

City decommissions Standfontein desalination plant – Cape Town

The Standfontein desalination plant was decommissioned at midnight on Wednesday, June 17 a month earlier than scheduled. Over a period of two years, the temporary plant contributed massively to the City’s water supply, providing 3.8 billion litres at a time when Cape Town was close to running out of potable water. The plant will now be broken down and the land restored to its former condition.

Since it commissioned the desalination plant two years ago, the City of Cape Town said, it “has acquired valuable knowledge through hands-on experience about the operation of this alternative water technology”.

City officials now feel confident about their ability to pursue the large scale desalination project included in the Water Strategy.

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Covid-19: Handwashing is ‘not a threat’ to Cape Town’s water supply

Cape Town – The City of Cape Town has said residents must continue washing their hands in a bid to curb the spread of the Covid-19 pandemic and not to worry that it might be a threat to the water supply.

This comes as the weekly dams level statistics were released on Monday, showing that dams supplying the Cape metro have declined by 1,3% over the past week (9 March – 15 March 2020) to 61,3% of total capacity.

Mayco member for water and waste Xanthea Limberg said: “While mindful consumption of water is still important, the City encourages residents to proceed with diligent hand-washing practices for the benefit of our individual and collective health. Hand-washing uses comparatively less water than other activities and is not expected to pose a threat to water security.”

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Drought worsening in large parts of Eastern Cape – Africa

Residents in Port Alfred are left without water for long periods and some are totally reliant on water tanks for their supply

The drought affecting large parts of the Eastern Cape is worsening.  The coastal town of Port Alfred and the surrounding towns in the Ndlambe Municipality have almost run out of water.

The areas supply dam is only 6% full and water rationing is in place.  The municipality is calling on residents to use water sparingly to avoid a day zero scenario.

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City dragged to court for over R20m due to ongoing Cape desalination plant spat – Cape Town

Cape Town – Managers at the desalination plant at the Waterfront intend to continue with litigation against the City due to the lack of progress in reaching a settlement.

Quality Filtration Services (QFS) is dragging the City to court, seeking over R20million in damages after contractual disputes.

The director of QFS, Musa Ndlovu, said: “In response to our papers submitted to the high court in July, the City of Cape Town responded with a plea on August 12.

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City of Cape Town vows to defend contractual dispute over desalination plant – Cape Town

The City of Cape Town Council says it filed an intention to defend a litigation battle with Quality Filtration Systems (QFS) in connection with contractual disputes over its desalination plants.

“It must be understood clearly that the city did not institute court proceedings, it was QFS,” the City of Cape Town Council said.

Mayoral committee member for water and waste services Xanthea Limberg said the city council did not intend to litigate through the media, but it was understood the two parties were in meetings trying to negotiate an out of court settlement. Last month, QFS lodged court papers in the Western Cape High Court.

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Desalination plant provider takes legal action against City of Cape Town – Cape Town

Cape Town – The company in charge of the desalination plant at the Waterfront is taking legal action against the City.

Quality Filtration Systems (QFS) lodged court papers in the Western Cape High Court on Thursday. 

QFS managing director Herman Smit said: “The plant is still not in operation as the contractual disputes have not been settled. The City has failed to clarify its legal position relative to the water to be injected. QFS have, via their legal advisor, formally advised the City that QFS does not believe the City is meeting its legal obligations to comply with the necessary water safety regulations.”

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Work to commence on R15bn Amdec Group Harbour Arch precinct – Cape Town

Good news for the Cape Town property market as work is set to commence on major new developments, among them the Amdec Group’s R15bn Harbour Arch precinct.

Early purchasers will be reaping the rewards of buying into Harbour Arch, but there is still value to be had with the second tower launching this year. 

It competes on a global scale in terms of quality and innovation, which means there is a fair expectation of it yielding consistently strong returns on investment.

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Desalination plant ends contract with City of Cape Town, plans to sue – Cape Town

Quality Filtration Systems (QFS), the V&A Waterfront desalination plant owner, has terminated its water supply contract with the City of Cape Town and will pursue legal action. The City was notified of this decision on May 7, GroundUp reports.

“The City is disappointed with this unilateral decision and is now considering the legal ramifications,” the city said in a media statement on May 9.

The R60-million plant has been dormant since February, due to concerns about dirty sea water.

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