Cape Town

City dragged to court for over R20m due to ongoing Cape desalination plant spat – Cape Town

Cape Town – Managers at the desalination plant at the Waterfront intend to continue with litigation against the City due to the lack of progress in reaching a settlement.

Quality Filtration Services (QFS) is dragging the City to court, seeking over R20million in damages after contractual disputes.

The director of QFS, Musa Ndlovu, said: “In response to our papers submitted to the high court in July, the City of Cape Town responded with a plea on August 12.

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City of Cape Town vows to defend contractual dispute over desalination plant – Cape Town

The City of Cape Town Council says it filed an intention to defend a litigation battle with Quality Filtration Systems (QFS) in connection with contractual disputes over its desalination plants.

“It must be understood clearly that the city did not institute court proceedings, it was QFS,” the City of Cape Town Council said.

Mayoral committee member for water and waste services Xanthea Limberg said the city council did not intend to litigate through the media, but it was understood the two parties were in meetings trying to negotiate an out of court settlement. Last month, QFS lodged court papers in the Western Cape High Court.

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Desalination plant provider takes legal action against City of Cape Town – Cape Town

Cape Town – The company in charge of the desalination plant at the Waterfront is taking legal action against the City.

Quality Filtration Systems (QFS) lodged court papers in the Western Cape High Court on Thursday. 

QFS managing director Herman Smit said: “The plant is still not in operation as the contractual disputes have not been settled. The City has failed to clarify its legal position relative to the water to be injected. QFS have, via their legal advisor, formally advised the City that QFS does not believe the City is meeting its legal obligations to comply with the necessary water safety regulations.”

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Work to commence on R15bn Amdec Group Harbour Arch precinct – Cape Town

Good news for the Cape Town property market as work is set to commence on major new developments, among them the Amdec Group’s R15bn Harbour Arch precinct.

Early purchasers will be reaping the rewards of buying into Harbour Arch, but there is still value to be had with the second tower launching this year. 

It competes on a global scale in terms of quality and innovation, which means there is a fair expectation of it yielding consistently strong returns on investment.

(LINK).

Desalination plant ends contract with City of Cape Town, plans to sue – Cape Town

Quality Filtration Systems (QFS), the V&A Waterfront desalination plant owner, has terminated its water supply contract with the City of Cape Town and will pursue legal action. The City was notified of this decision on May 7, GroundUp reports.

“The City is disappointed with this unilateral decision and is now considering the legal ramifications,” the city said in a media statement on May 9.

The R60-million plant has been dormant since February, due to concerns about dirty sea water.

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CoCT ‘knew water was contaminated’ before awarding desalination plant tender – Cape Town

Cape Town – The company that built the desalination plant at the Waterfront, and is threatening the City of Cape Town with legal action over outstanding payments, said the city knew the water was contaminated before the tender was awarded.

Quality Filtration System (QFS) said they had uncovered information that the city was aware of the same contamination in the seawater in 2017 but neglected to divulge this information during the tender processes.

Herman Smit, managing director of QFS, said: “QFS have, via their legal adviser, formally advised the City that QFS do not believe the city is meeting its legal obligations to comply with the necessary water safety regulations. The city should be conducting routine tests of the local seawater quality and identifying any potential health risks.

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Cape Town’s plan to not run out of water again – Cape Town

Cape Town is drilling boreholes and wells at a rapid rate to ensure it has a stable water supply.

According to a report in the Sunday Times, over 26,000 registered boreholes and wells have been created. This is compared to 1,500 in 2016.

The continued focus on drilling for water comes just over a year after Cape Town faced severe droughts and water shortages.

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Desalination is too costly, says Umgeni Water – Durban – South Africa

The idea of using desalination as an alternative to augment Umgeni Water’s water resources will be written off unless industries can be convinced to buy-in and support the concept.

Desalination had been punted as the panacea for the country’s water problems during the recent drought.

In Durban, feasibility studies were conducted and two potential sites identified for pilot projects.

(LINK).

Cape water consumption threatens storage levels – Cape Town – South Africa

The days of watering your garden with municipal water in the Western Cape may never come back despite Cape town’s six main dams sitting at 76 percent capacity. 

WWF South Africa says consumption in Cape Town has increased since water restrictions were eased, and if residents are not careful, drought conditions in the province will continue to get worse.

(LINK).

All 3 of CT’s desalination plants finally up and running – Cape Town – South Africa

After months of delays, all three of Cape Town’s desalination plants are up and running. The City of Cape Town says its various water projects are now all on track.

The city is still in the midst of a drought. There’ve been many delays at the Monwabisi desalination because of a dispute between the city and the local community.

Residents were demanding that more of them be employed at the facility. It was the last plant to be brought online.

(LINK).

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