California

Why the cost of water in San Diego has blown past L.A., according to a new report – California

San Diego is at the end of the pipeline when it comes to importing water from the Colorado River and the Sacramento Bay Delta.

So it’s no surprise its costs have exceeded those of Los Angeles and other parts of Southern California.

However, a recent report from a leading expert finds there’s more behind the skyrocketing price of water in the San Diego region, which over the last decade has seen wholesale rates increasingly outpace neighbors to the north.

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Opponents commission simulation of what sea level rise, tsunamis could mean for Poseidon desal plant – California

Poseidon Water’s proposal for the plant is working its way through various agencies getting approvals necessary to start construction.

Those behind the project argue they have done their own research based on the standards used by the state looking at sea level rise and tsunami hazards in the area of the project and it would not be vulnerable given what was is forecast during its operating life.

The proposed desalination plant in Huntington Beach last year gained needed approvals from the Regional Water Quality Control Board, prompting two environmental groups – Orange County Coastkeeper and the California Coastkeeper Alliance – to sue in September, saying the board’s environmental review of the project was inadequate.

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Huntington Beach desalination facility needed for environment, tax base – California

Every day I walk near the ocean I am reminded how fragile is our precious Huntington Beach. As the mayor of Surf City, I am most dedicated to keeping its ecology pristine.

It’s essential for the planet. And it’s for the enjoyment of our residents – and the millions of visitors who come here each year to relax and enjoy the surf and sand, while patronizing our restaurants and shops.

That’s why I support Huntington Beach’s new desalination facility for our city. It will be located next to the AES power plant off Newland Street and PCH. One of the best features of the new facility is it will sport a zero-carbon footprint.

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As OC Digs Deeper for Drinking Water, Worries About Contamination Arise – California

Due to California’s ongoing drought, cities in North and Central Orange County have a greater risk of being exposed to drinking water pollution as they rely mostly from groundwater sources.

According to attorney and water policy expert Felicia Marcus, who is also the William C. Landreth Visiting Fellow at Stanford University, regional officials hope to purify this groundwater and are also actively pursuing collaborations with local water districts in order to obtain clean drinking water for its residents.

South Orange County, though, is not affected by this dilemma as at least 90% of its water is imported.

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Environmentalists sound alarm over proposed water initiative – California

A proposed ballot measure that would dedicate $100 billion to bolster California’s water supply is drawing a sharp rebuke, not only for the amount of spending but also for the dramatic sidesteps it would allow in the environmental review process.

For example, the proposal would make the controversial plan for a Huntington Beach desalination plant eligible for a huge taxpayer subsidy — even though the private, for-profit Poseidon Water company currently intends to pay for the $1.4 billion in construction costs.

If the Coastal Commission rejects the pending permit application for the Poseidon project, a single gubernatorial appointee — the Secretary for Natural Resources — could override any decision and grant the permit, according to the ballot proposal.

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Water initiative is a budget grab by Big Ag – California

Whoever coined the phrase “Whisky is for drinking, water is for fighting” didn’t have things quite right.

In California, water is for scamming. The newest example is a majestically cynical ploy being foisted on taxpayers by some of the state’s premier water hogs, in the guise of a proposed ballot measure titled the “Water Infrastructure Funding Act of 2022″ — or, as its promoters call it, the More Water Now initiative.

The measure’s backers need to gather nearly 1 million signatures to place the measure on the November 2022 ballot. That process has just begun, and its outcome is uncertain.

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Marin water pipeline plan draws environmental lawsuit – California

A Marin environmental group is suing to block a proposed water pipeline on the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge, citing the potential harm to endangered fish.

The plaintiffs also allege the Marin Municipal Water District project could open the door to tens of thousands of new homes being developed in the county.

The Fairfax-based North Coast Rivers Alliance filed the lawsuit on Thursday in Marin County Superior Court.

California remains in precarious water predicament – California

October was a welcome water wonderland, but November was pretty much a dry bust for the Golden States.

Was California’s wet October a sucker punch to the state’s all important reservoirs? “Historically, 1976, which was historically dry, started off with a wet October, so we’re not counting our chickens yet,” said East Bay Municipal Utilities District Public Information Officer Andrea Pook.

Ski resort conditions tracker SkiCentral.com, says of the big 25 California resorts it tracks, only three are open and on a very limited basis.

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Keep Diablo Canyon open to help meet emission reduction goals – California

California has established itself as a global leader in the fight against climate change. It has set ambitious, economy-wide emission reduction targets and mandated that all of the state’s electricity come from carbon-free sources by 2045.

These are aggressive goals, befitting the clout and resolve of the world’s 5th largest economy. Yet, we continue to see rising temperatures, record drought and intense wildfires.

What if everything California and the nation is doing to slow climate change just isn’t enough?

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Proposed ballot measure would fast-track construction of dams, desalination plants and other water projects – California

California has not built enough new reservoirs, desalination plants and other water projects because there are too many delays, too many lawsuits and too much red tape.

That’s the message from a growing coalition of Central Valley farmers and Southern California desalination supporters who have begun collecting signatures for a statewide ballot measure that would fast-track big water projects and provide billions of dollars to fund them — potentially setting up a major political showdown with environmentalists next year shaped by the state’s ongoing drought.

The measure, known as the “Water Infrastructure Funding Act of 2022,” needs 997,132 signatures of registered voters by April 29 to qualify for the November 2022 statewide ballot.

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