California

Water & Wastewater Workers Considered Essential During COVID-19 Outbreak – California

10 workers are quarantined inside the Claude Lewis Carlsbad Desalination Plant in Carlsbad, California for the next three weeks. 

The workers are monitoring and adjusting gauges and switches, watching for leaks, and completing other tasks needed to safeguard San Diego County’s only significant local source of drinking water. All 10 volunteered themselves. The Carlsbad plant is home to 40 employees overall, reported the San Diego Tribune.

The request for volunteers was a precaution against the spread of COVID-19, reported the San Diego Tribune.

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Poseidon desal plant gets fresh analysis, but coronavirus delays Friday meeting – California

A water board staff report prepared for the meeting provides apparent justification for the board to approve the project, but it also notes the board may disagree and request a revision.

Poseidon Water needs just two more permits to go forward — one from the water board and then one from the Coastal Commission

The workshop planned for Friday was to follow up a similar session held in December. At that meeting, several key issues continued to concern some board members, who requested additional information on whether the desalinated water was needed and whether the proposed mitigation was adequate for the environmental damage expected.

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Multimillion-dollar contract to run El Segundo water recycling plant again awarded without bidding – California

Continuing a practice started in the 1990s, the West Basin Municipal Water District has again bypassed competitive bidding in awarding a multimillion-dollar contract to operate its wastewater treatment facility in El Segundo.

The district board recently renewed a five-year contract worth roughly $13 million a year to Suez Water Environmental Services to run the award-winning plant. Since 2016, Suez has earned roughly $61 million on the deal with West Basin.

Suez — and before that United Water, which Suez purchased in 2000 — had previously been awarded contracts worth tens of millions of dollars to operate the plant, all without bidding.The latest contract is roughly $2 million less per year than its previous agreement.

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Maestas: Poseidon Desalination Would Worsen Environmental Injustice in Orange County – California

What would California be without the beach? I grew up in Irvine with an awareness of how fortunate we are to live near the ocean. As a child, my parents and babysitters took me and my brother to Corona Del Mar and Newport Beach frequently during the summer.

I have many happy memories of enjoying the waves at “our beaches” while bodysurfing, building sandcastles, and seeing fish, anemones, sandcrabs, dolphins and jellyfish! We also took school field trips to Crystal Cove to learn about the ecosystem. These experiences taught me to respect the ocean and to understand that it is alive, a home for sea life and people.

That’s why it’s upsetting that our regional water board is moving closer to issuing permits for a project near my hometown that will harm our ocean, make us more vulnerable to climate change, and make our drinking water more expensive.

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Possible Water Board hearing on desalination plant is nearing – California

Those supporting Poseidon Water’s plans to build a saltwater-to-freshwater conversion factory on the Huntington Beach coast certainly hoped the desalination project would be moving forward in earnest by now.

A December 2019 vote on the desalination plant was put off, however, and Poseidon would have to wait a few more months before knowing whether it would be allowed to go forward with its ambitious $1 billion project.

Members of the Santa Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board are expected to make a decision on Poseidon’s project in April. Will the board finally approve the permits Poseidon has been seeking for several years?

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Why desalination can help quench California’s water needs – California

If you’ve ever created a personal budget, you know that assigning your money to different investment strategies is a crucial component to meet your financial goals.

When you stop dipping into your savings account each month, savings can begin to build.  

Understanding why desalination is so critical to California’s water future is a lot like building a personal budget. With a changing climate, growing population and booming economy, we need to include desalination in the water supply equation to help make up an imported water deficit.

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Desalination Plant Can Transform Monterey Peninsula And Help Avert Water Crisis – California

Nobody likes to look out to the Pacific Ocean and see oil derricks on the horizon. That’s why California wisely banned new offshore oil drilling 50 years ago.

But in Monterey County, coastal views are limited by a relic of a bygone era: a giant, industrial sand plant right on the dunes between Highway One and the ocean.

In 2017, the California Coastal Commission reached an agreement with the sand plant for operations to shut down by 2020 and for all buildings and equipment to be removed by 2023.

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Composites’ role in seawater reverse osmosis desalination – California

In an effort to solve water shortage issues in the U.S. state of California, Governor Gavin Newsom has ordered key state agencies to develop a blueprint for meeting California’s 21st century water needs, to ensure safe and resilient water supplies, flood protection and healthy waterways for the state’s communities, economy and environment.

Two solutions in which composites play a significant role are wastewater purification (which was featured in CW‘s January 2020 feature “Composites help take the waste out of wastewater”) and, the focus of this report, seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) desalination.

The problem in California is easy to understand, but difficult to solve: The original configuration of rivers, streams, lakes, bays and underground water (aquifers) in California has been reconfigured so extensively over the years to accommodate a growing population and conflicting interests that these resources cannot be relied upon to meet future water needs — even the near future.

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As Groundwater Basins ‘Rest,’ Santa Barbara Looks to Reservoirs for Future Water Supplies – California

This winter has started out as a wet one, but even if the rain tapers off, Santa Barbara can meet the water demands of its customers through 2022 with existing supplies, according to city staff.

It’s been more than eight years since Lake Cachuma filled up and spilled, and groundwater basins all over Santa Barbara County are at historically low levels after being heavily pumped during the long drought.

Groundwater well pumps are off to help basins “rest,” and it will take an estimated five years for the basins to recover from the drought, water supply analyst Dakota Corey told the city’s Water Commission at Thursday’s meeting. That’s how long it took after the drought in the early 1990s, she said.

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Water Authority Offers to Settle Long-Running Rate Dispute with MWD – California

The San Diego County Water Authority’s board offered Thursday to settle a long-running dispute over rates with the giant Metropolitan Water District of Southern California.

The offer, made following a special board meeting, asks MWD to make $140 million in payments to San Diego County water customers to cover claims from 2011 through 2020 and, in the future, follow new, transparent procedures in setting water rates.

“The Water Authority’s proposal would benefit residents across San Diego County, enhance understanding of how MWD’s rates are set, and provide more opportunities for our agencies to collaborate in ways that would benefit water management across the Southwest,” said Water Authority Board Chair Jim Madaffer.

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