California

Monterey Bay Desalination Plant Debated by Coastal Commission – California

The Monterey Peninsula is running out of water.

The fog-shrouded, cypress-dotted land formation jutting into the Pacific Ocean forming the southern reach of the Monterey Bay is drying up as underground water aquifers become increasingly depleted.

The lack of water inhibits economic growth, prevents the development of housing – including the affordable variety – and restricts commercial opportunity.

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EIR released for West Basin desalinization plant – California

The West Basin Municipal Water District on Wednesday released the much anticipated Environmental Impact Report for the ocean water desalination plant it has proposed in El Segundo. 

The report, required by state and federal law, does not differ significantly from a draft version released 18 months ago. But its release is a significant step towards West Basin’s goal of constructing a desalination plant on the 33-acre El Segundo Generating Station site currently operated by NRG in El Segundo, just north of the Manhattan Beach border.

Like the draft report, the final EIR finds that the environmental impacts of the proposed facility are “less than significant” and thus legally compliant. 

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California Supreme Court Rejects Environmental Challenges to Monterey Water Project – America

The $330-Million Monterey Peninsula Water Supply Project (MPWSP) took a step forward, as the California Supreme Court recently denied challenges to the sufficiency of the project’s Environmental Impact Report (EIR)/Environmental Impact Statement (EIS).

The long-awaited desalination plant located off the coast of Monterey is being developed by California American Water Company (CalAm) and is intended to replace the Monterey Peninsula community’s existing Carmel River and Seaside Groundwater Basin supplies.

These supplies have been constrained for decades by legal decisions and habitat concerns, with desalinated seawater. 

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Desalination: Poseidon still trying to plant its trident into Huntington Beach – California

Southern California was hit with enough rain in 2019 for many experts and observers to declare an end to the region’s most recent drought – which could be bad news for Poseidon Water’s plans to build a desalination plant near land’s edge in Huntington Beach.

It is hard to drum up a lot of noise for water security when we’re not in a drought. The current state of Southern California’s water security – or insecurity – certainly isn’t giving Poseidon any ammunition to make its case for a $1 billion desalination plant in Huntington Beach.

Southern California’s droughts, of course, are cyclical, so the day will come again when Poseidon will be able to play its water insecurity card. A lack of a drought today, just the same, isn’t going to derail Poseidon’s quest to build a desalination plant in Huntington Beach.

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Gage: Setting the Record Straight on Seawater Desalination – California

A recent news release posted on the Voice of OC website was clouded by mischaracterizations of the Claude “Bud” Lewis Carlsbad Desalination Plant, which provides an important source of drinking water for San Diego County and reduces our region’s reliance on the Sacramento-San Joaquin Bay-Delta.

The plant is the result of a historic public-private partnership between the San Diego County Water Authority and Poseidon Water to ensure supply reliability for more than 3 million residents across the region.

It helped to ensure that the Water Authority had sufficient water to meet demand during the last drought, and we are confident it will help us weather the next drought … and the one after that.

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Poseidon Water Congratulates the National Alliance for Water Innovation (NAWI) Team on $100M DOE Desalination Hub – California

Poseidon Water is proud to be part of the National Alliance for Water Innovation (NAWI) Team that was selected to receive $100 million in funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to establish a new Energy-Water Desalination Hub. The Hub’s purpose is to advance state-of-the-art technology and research in desalination.

Poseidon is a national leader in the development of water supply and treatment projects using a public-private partnership approach and manages the award-winning Claude “Bud” Lewis Carlsbad Desalination Plant.

Headquartered at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California, NAWI was created in 2017 to support the U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy-Water Desalination Hub.

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Feds award $100 million to Lawrence Berkeley-led consortium to tap tech for water desalination – California

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory won a five-year, $100 million award to serve as a Department of Energy hub to look at “water security” issues, including energy-efficient and cost-effective desalination technologies.

The money, some of which still must be appropriated by Congress, also includes research into treating nontraditional water sources for a variety of uses.

The award to the National Alliance for Water Innovation led by the Energy Department’s Berkeley Lab and including Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the National Energy Technology Laboratory, 19 universities and 10 companies

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California Focus: Desalination loses more urgency in hyper-wet winter – California

Desalination began to lose its urgency among Californians and their public officials two years ago, after the drought-busting winter of 2016-17, when heavy rain and snow ended dry conditions in most of the state.

The idea of drawing potable water from the sea became even less of a priority this year, when an autumn of record-level fires gave way to one of the state’s wettest winters on record.

(LINK).

Desalination loses more urgency in hyper-wet winter – California

Desalination began to lose its urgency among Californians and their public officials two years ago, after the drought-busting winter of 2016-17, when heavy rain and snow ended dry conditions in most of the state.

The idea of drawing potable water from the sea became even less of a priority this year, when an autumn of record-level fires gave way to one of the state’s wettest winters on record.

Reservoirs are brimming. Instead of desperately seeking new sources of water, Californians were moaning about the billions of excess gallons that washed into the Pacific Ocean and the San Francisco Bay. Depleted aquifers began their path to replenishment, too, with snow levels in the water-producing Sierra Nevada Mountains far above normal.

(LINK).

Thomas D. Elias: Desalination loses more urgency in hyper-wet winter – California

Desalination began to lose its urgency among Californians and their public officials two years ago, after the drought-busting winter of 2016-17, when heavy rain and snow ended dry conditions in most of the state.

The idea of drawing potable water from the sea became even less of a priority this year, when an autumn of record-level fires gave way to one of the state’s wettest winters on record.

(LINK).

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