California

Despite Expected Rainfall, Santa Barbara County Still at 10-Year Low

Santa Barbara County is experiencing its lowest rainfall in 10 years, a scenario that is likely the new normal.

“There is substantial uncertainty about how climate change will affect precipitation in our county,” said Matt Young, Santa Barbara County’s water agency manager.

“However, the best available science indicates that we may see longer drought periods punctuated by years with more intense rainfall.”

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Despite a Punishing Drought, San Diego Has Water. It Wasn’t Easy – United States

In many parts of California, reminders abound that the American West is running out of water.

“Bathtub rings” mark the shrinking of the state’s biggest reservoirs to some of their lowest recorded levels. 

Fields lie fallow, as farmers grapple with an uncertain future. A bed-and-breakfast owner spends $5 whenever a tourist showers.

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Sustainability takes top priority at Carlsbad Aquafarm – California

San Diego’s waterways are a source of pride for many of us, but there is a spot in Carlsbad that is providing much more than pretty views. They provide mussels and oysters. Millions and millions of them.

In this Earth 8 report, News 8’s Neda Iranpour learns about oysters and what makes them so sustainable.

The Carlsbad Aquafarm sits between the Pacific Ocean and I-5, in the calm and fairly clear waters of the Agua Hedionda Lagoon.

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Teams from Unified Command Test Water, Soil at San Onofre in Response to OC Oil Spill – California

Officials said Sunday that no oiled wildlife has been located in San Diego County from last weekend’s massive oil spill off the coast of Orange County.

Meanwhile, San Diegans can expect to see shoreline cleanup assessment teams and contracted crews in protective gear monitoring, inspecting and cleaning San Diego County beaches.

On Sunday, they also conducted water and soil sampling along San Onofre Beach.

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Fort Bragg desalination plant ready to be called into service – California

A pair of recent showers has swelled the flow of the Noyo River near Fort Bragg ever so slightly.

This comes after weeks when the river ran at a trickle so low the city was often forced to turn off the intake pumps that feed water to the town’s homes and businesses.

Though located about 4½ miles from Noyo Harbor, the water supply at Madsen Hole, where the intake pipe meets the river, was overwhelmed in recent weeks by brackish tidewaters that pushed upstream.

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Katadyn Desalination Wins Three-Year Contract with United States Navy –  California

Katadyn Desalination, LLC, an enterprising desalination manufacturer in Petaluma California, is proud to announce that it has won a three-year contract to deliver lifesaving, hand-operated desalination devices for the United States Navy. 

Katadyn Desalination is part of the Katadyn Group, the leading provider of reliable, sustainable, and simple solutions for safe drinking water treatment no matter the location.

Whether outdoors, at sea, for emergency preparedness, humanitarian or tactical missions or industrial applications, clean water becomes a reality with Katadyn products.

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Santa Barbara’s bird refuge water level drops, revealing another sign of the on going drought – California

only need to take a walk or a drive by the Andree Clark Bird Refuge in Santa Barbara on Cabrillo Blvd. to see how tiny the rainfall runoff has been this year.

The shores are longer and deeper than normal. The undergrowth smells. The appearance is dismal.

Fortunately it is not a main water source for the city. That is a combination of several inputs including water from Cachuma Lake, underground wells and the desalination plant in use regularly along with conservation efforts and reclaimed water.

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New cost study could jump start Doheny desalination project – California

A central obstacle for a proposed desalination plant near Doheny State Beach has been reluctance of south county water districts to get involved as partners.

But an extensive analysis of financial projections presented over four hours on Thursday, Sept. 2 — and approval of an information campaign to explain the costs to those districts — has given the project sponsor, the small South Coast Water District, hope that it can soon firm up those partnerships.

“I think in the next few months, we’re going to have a sense for whether this is a partnership-type project or it’s go-it-alone,” said South Coast Chairman Rick Erkeneff at the online event.

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Pressed by drought and climate change, a California city turns to desalination – California

Founded on a lush plain of the largest estuary on the West Coast of North America shortly after gold was discovered, Antioch’s fortunes have always risen and fallen with the delta tides.

One of California’s oldest settlements, what started as a ranch town morphed decades ago into an industrial city due to its riverside locale and proximity to San Francisco.

Family farms gave way to coal and copper mines, mills and warehouses took over downtown and the city steadily grew into one of the Bay Area’s largest.

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Editorial: Recall candidates have shallow takes on California’s water problems – California

California is suffering from extremely dry conditions, so it stands to reason that the candidates trying to oust and replace Gov.

Gavin Newsom have latched onto persistent but extremely shallow and woefully outdated claims about the management of the state’s water supply.

Their argument is that without Newsom (or indeed any Democrat) in the governor’s mansion, we’d have more dams, fewer wildfires, greener fields, longer showers, lusher lawns and as much pure, cool drinking water as we could possibly handle.

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