California

Carlsbad lagoon dredging starts soon – California

Seawater desalination operator Poseidon is poised to take over the Agua Hedionda Lagoon maintenance dredging that has been done by local power companies since 1954.

Permits are being obtained for the work to begin in November or early December with expectations to finish by mid-April, said Poseidon Senior Vice President Peter MacLaggan at a meeting earlier this month of the Carlsbad Beach Preservation Commission.

Sand from the dredging will be spread north of the lagoon inlet for the first time in about five years, MacLaggan said.

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‘Environmental justice’ starts by providing more water – California

Environmentalists have won the latest battle in California’s water wars, as California American Water just announced it is temporarily withdrawing its application to build a desalination plant on an old sand mine in the largely low-income town of Marina near Monterey.

The proposal faced a tough approval process at the California Coastal Commission after local activists complained about its effects on their community.

In a recent article, the Los Angeles Times asked this loaded question in its headline: “Is California serious about environmental justice? This water fight is a test.”

Conservationists Split Over Poseidon Desal Project’s Potential to Help Bolsa Chica Wetlands – California

Along a Huntington Beach coastline dotted with oil rigs and a power plant, one of California’s largest remaining saltwater marshes has been a source of pride for local environmentalists.

But the marsh, known as the Bolsa Chica Wetlands, is endangered despite a years-long struggle to pull together sufficient public funding for its upkeep.

Nearby, the Poseidon Water Co., which has been in a decades-long, controversial fight to build a seawater desalination plant next to the AES energy station at the south end of the city, has justified its project partly with a promise to finance the wetlands’ conservation.

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Water company withdraws desalination proposal as battle over environmental justice heats up – California

Amid mounting controversy and concerns over environmental justice, California American Water on Wednesday withdrew its application for a desalination project in the small Monterey Bay town of Marina.

The proposal had become one of the most fraught issues to come before the California Coastal Commission, which was set to vote Thursday.

The decision would have been the first major test of the commission’s new power to review not only harm to the environment when making decisions but also harm to underrepresented communities.

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California Coastal Commission must halt unjust, destructive Monterey desalination plant – California

As two mayors of color, we oppose a desalination project that would impose environmental injustice and economic racism on the people of Seaside and Marina in Monterey County.

The California Coastal Commission will vote on Thursday whether to approve a desalination plant being forced on the Monterey Peninsula by California American Water (Cal-Am).

The Monterey Peninsula does not want or need this oversized, overpriced groundwater desalination plant. We have a far more cost-effective solution for our future water needs in expanding our new recycled water project — Pure Water Monterey (PWM).

Poseidon’s Huntington Beach desalination plant still in choppy waters – California

As Poseidon Water pursues the final government approvals needed to build one of the country’s biggest seawater desalination plants.

The company still cannot definitively say who will buy the 50 million gallons a day of drinking water it wants to produce on the Orange County coast.

That’s one of several questions that continue to dog the $1-billion Huntington Beach project as Poseidon tries to seal an iron-clad deal more than two decades after it first proposed the ocean desalter.

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Santa Barbara Council Accepts $10 Million Matching Grant to Operate Desalination Plant – California

The Santa Barbara City Council voted 7-0 on Tuesday to accept a $10 million grant — with the understanding that it will run the plant at full capacity for at least 36 out of the next 40 years.

Some environmentalists objected to the council’s decision, citing environmental concerns.

The city was awarded a $10 million matching grant in 2018 from the California Department of Water Resources for the reactivation of the Charles E. Meyer Desalination Plant, 525 E. Yanonali St.

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Santa Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board Staff Recommends Approval of Permit for Huntington Beach Desal Project – California

HUNTINGTON BEACH, Calif., July 22, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Today, the Santa Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board (“Regional Board”) issued a Staff Report recommending approval of a Tentative Order making amendments to and renewing its operating permit rst issued in 2006 for the proposed Huntington Beach Desalination Project (“Project”).

The Regional Board is scheduled to consider its staff-prepared permit and recommendation beginning on Thursday, July 30, 2020.

The Regional Board staff’s proposed permit amendment and renewal considered all requirements of the California Ocean Plan’s new seawater desalination policy and nds that there is an identied need for the 50 million gallons per day of desalinated water the Huntington Beach Desalination Project will provide.

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Controversial Poseidon desalination plant in Huntington Beach set for hearings this week – California

Poseidon Water’s seawater desalination plant in Huntington Beach, first proposed in 1998, could be getting closer to beginning construction after more than two decades.

The Santa Ana Regional Water Board will hold online hearings this week and decide whether to issue Poseidon a permit.

The hearings begin at 9 a.m. Thursday and are scheduled to continue Friday, as well as Aug. 7 if needed, with a vote scheduled at the end of the hearings. The hearings can be viewed at cal-span.org.

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Governor says Baja used water as a piggy bank. Critics worry about his bigger plan – California

Baja California’s new governor, Jaime Bonilla, says he is battling to clean up widespread corruption that for years ate away at the state’s water agency.

Even Bonilla’s critics acknowledge the corruption and the failing water system, which results in frequent sewage spills that foul Tijuana and San Diego beaches.

But those critics also allege the high-profile investigation, which has already led to 30 criminal complaints, is aimed at Bonilla’s political enemies. And they worry that it could be used to build up his own nest of public funds.

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