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Desalination: Poseidon still trying to plant its trident into Huntington Beach – California

Southern California was hit with enough rain in 2019 for many experts and observers to declare an end to the region’s most recent drought – which could be bad news for Poseidon Water’s plans to build a desalination plant near land’s edge in Huntington Beach.

It is hard to drum up a lot of noise for water security when we’re not in a drought. The current state of Southern California’s water security – or insecurity – certainly isn’t giving Poseidon any ammunition to make its case for a $1 billion desalination plant in Huntington Beach.

Southern California’s droughts, of course, are cyclical, so the day will come again when Poseidon will be able to play its water insecurity card. A lack of a drought today, just the same, isn’t going to derail Poseidon’s quest to build a desalination plant in Huntington Beach.

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Gage: Setting the Record Straight on Seawater Desalination – California

A recent news release posted on the Voice of OC website was clouded by mischaracterizations of the Claude “Bud” Lewis Carlsbad Desalination Plant, which provides an important source of drinking water for San Diego County and reduces our region’s reliance on the Sacramento-San Joaquin Bay-Delta.

The plant is the result of a historic public-private partnership between the San Diego County Water Authority and Poseidon Water to ensure supply reliability for more than 3 million residents across the region.

It helped to ensure that the Water Authority had sufficient water to meet demand during the last drought, and we are confident it will help us weather the next drought … and the one after that.

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Reduced water supply for two weeks – Caribbean

ALREADY suffering the effects of a severe dry season, consumers in central and south Trinidad are being advised to brace for a reduced water supply. The desalination plant in Point Lisas is scheduled to undergo routine maintenance from September 30 to October 15.

The plant produces 40 million gallons per day and is used to supply the Point Lisas industrial estate as well as augment supplies to central and south Trinidad.

WASA acting chief executive officer Alan Poon King and general manager of the Desalination Company of TT (Desalcott) John Thompson, made the announcement during a joint media conference in Point Lisas on Thursday. They outlined the reasons for the shutdown and WASA’s plans to deal with the impact.

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Court asked to nix IDE-Hutchison Sorek B desalination bid – Kansas

4A Desalination Group, which is competing in the tender for construction of the Sorek B desalination plant, today petitioned the Jerusalem District Court to disqualify IDE and Hutchison from participation in the tender.

A public committee headed by Ministry of National Infrastructure, Energy, and Water Resources director general Ehud (Udi) Adiri suspected fraud in the operation of the Sorek A desalination plant. IDE and Hutchison were part owners of the plant.

The committee was formed following a report by “Globes” that the proportion of salt in the water supplied by the facility was up to four times as high as the standard in the franchise agreement. The committee, which sent its findings to the police, ratified the allegation in the report that the deviations in the proportion of salt were systematic, and had taken place for years.

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Rice to play critical role in $100M DOE desalination hub – United States

Rice is a partner in the National Alliance for Water Innovation (NAWI), a consortium that won a five-year, $100 million Department of Energy award to establish an Energy-Water Desalination Hub that addresses U.S. water security issues.

NAWI, which includes four national laboratories, 19 universities and 10 industry partners and more than 200 affiliates, is led by and headquartered at DOE’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California.NAWI will focus on early-stage research and development for energy-efficient and cost-competitive desalination technologies and for treating nontraditional water sources for various uses.

The alliance’s goal is to advance technologies that will secure a circular water economy in which 90% of nontraditional water sources — such as seawater, brackish water and produced water from industry and agriculture — can be cost-competitive with existing water sources within 10 years.

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Feds award $100 million to Lawrence Berkeley-led consortium to tap tech for water desalination – California

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory won a five-year, $100 million award to serve as a Department of Energy hub to look at “water security” issues, including energy-efficient and cost-effective desalination technologies.

The money, some of which still must be appropriated by Congress, also includes research into treating nontraditional water sources for a variety of uses.

The award to the National Alliance for Water Innovation led by the Energy Department’s Berkeley Lab and including Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the National Energy Technology Laboratory, 19 universities and 10 companies

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Gov’t working to address water challenges – America

The second-generation politician, who has now been placed in charge of the water portfolio, acknowledges that recent climatic events across the Caribbean suggest that the threat is no longer futuristic, but is either happening or about to happen.

The minister with responsibility for water, in an interview with the Jamaica Observer last week, said several things have made this much clearer in the Corporate Area, in recent months including the supply from the Mona Dam, which has dropped from 12 million gallons per day to three million gallons per day.

The Hope system is down from 5.7 million gallons per day to 2.8 gallons per day, affecting some very significant communities and institutions, including The University Hospital of the West Indies in Mona, Old Hope Road, Lady Musgrave Road, and commercial areas like New Kingston; Constant Spring, which ideally provides 16 million gallons per day, is now averaging nine to 10 million gallons per day.

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Southeast Florida’s climate challenges are being properly addressed – Florida

No issue is more important to the future of southeast Florida than sea-level rise. However, a recent op-ed on the threat of rising sea levels to water supplies in South Florida included some factual errors and neglected important context.

As resilience officers for the four counties of southeast Florida, we wish to correct and expand the record.

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Seawater Desalination: A Solution Water Shortage: AMPAC USA – America

AMPAC USA works in designing and manufacturing some of the best seawater desalination equipment for a variety of operations.

But does that answer all the water woes at once? Lately, one has been hearing nothing but shortages and depleting resources. Countries in Africa, South America, Asia and a few parts of North America are facing a very bad and gruesome problem of the water crisis.

Over a thousand children go every day without a single drop of water, Cape Town and several major cities across the globe came close to Day Zero, California lakes had dried up, farmers’ suicides in India were on the rise due to no rainfall.

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Chile’s President Announces Water Crisis Team Amid ‘Intense’ Drought – Chile

Chile’s President Sebastian Pinera on Thursday announced the creation of a working group of government agencies, academics and industry players to tackle the worst drought in 60 years which has spiked this year amid record lows of rainfall.

The government has declared water shortages in more than 50 communities across three regions of its normally lush central belt so far this year, and an associated agricultural emergency across more than 100.

It has pledged to spend $58 million in tapping more water sources and trucking water to people going without in rural areas.

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