America

Gov’t working to address water challenges – America

The second-generation politician, who has now been placed in charge of the water portfolio, acknowledges that recent climatic events across the Caribbean suggest that the threat is no longer futuristic, but is either happening or about to happen.

The minister with responsibility for water, in an interview with the Jamaica Observer last week, said several things have made this much clearer in the Corporate Area, in recent months including the supply from the Mona Dam, which has dropped from 12 million gallons per day to three million gallons per day.

The Hope system is down from 5.7 million gallons per day to 2.8 gallons per day, affecting some very significant communities and institutions, including The University Hospital of the West Indies in Mona, Old Hope Road, Lady Musgrave Road, and commercial areas like New Kingston; Constant Spring, which ideally provides 16 million gallons per day, is now averaging nine to 10 million gallons per day.

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Southeast Florida’s climate challenges are being properly addressed – Florida

No issue is more important to the future of southeast Florida than sea-level rise. However, a recent op-ed on the threat of rising sea levels to water supplies in South Florida included some factual errors and neglected important context.

As resilience officers for the four counties of southeast Florida, we wish to correct and expand the record.

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Seawater Desalination: A Solution Water Shortage: AMPAC USA – America

AMPAC USA works in designing and manufacturing some of the best seawater desalination equipment for a variety of operations.

But does that answer all the water woes at once? Lately, one has been hearing nothing but shortages and depleting resources. Countries in Africa, South America, Asia and a few parts of North America are facing a very bad and gruesome problem of the water crisis.

Over a thousand children go every day without a single drop of water, Cape Town and several major cities across the globe came close to Day Zero, California lakes had dried up, farmers’ suicides in India were on the rise due to no rainfall.

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Chile’s President Announces Water Crisis Team Amid ‘Intense’ Drought – Chile

Chile’s President Sebastian Pinera on Thursday announced the creation of a working group of government agencies, academics and industry players to tackle the worst drought in 60 years which has spiked this year amid record lows of rainfall.

The government has declared water shortages in more than 50 communities across three regions of its normally lush central belt so far this year, and an associated agricultural emergency across more than 100.

It has pledged to spend $58 million in tapping more water sources and trucking water to people going without in rural areas.

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Mexican Region Gets First Desalination Plant for Agriculture Use in the Americas – Mexico

Weather conditions in San Q1uintin, a region in the northwestern Mexican state of Baja California, are good for growing crops year-round, but the lack of water in the area is forcing farmers to turn to innovative and environmentally friendly technologies, such as desalination, to deal with the problem.

The drought that affected San Quintin from 1985 to 2015 caused the amount of land under cultivation to fall from 28,000 hectares (69,135 acres) to 7,889 hectares (19,479 acres), a reduction of 72 percent.

A company called Grupo BerryMex recently announced that it was going to start operating the first agricultural desalination plant of its kind in the Americas in San Quintin, allowing fields to be irrigated.

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California Focus: Desalination loses more urgency in hyper-wet winter – California

Desalination began to lose its urgency among Californians and their public officials two years ago, after the drought-busting winter of 2016-17, when heavy rain and snow ended dry conditions in most of the state.

The idea of drawing potable water from the sea became even less of a priority this year, when an autumn of record-level fires gave way to one of the state’s wettest winters on record.

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Expert cautions developing countries over water desalination plants – San Diego

A water expert is cautioning developing countries over the establishment of water desalination plants as a means of providing potable water to the populace.

Jeremy Crutchfield of the San Diego County Water Authority in the USA says desalination (the treatment of seawater through the removal of salt) is a very expensive process because of the high cost of operation including the vast amount of electricity needed to operate such plants.

Water companies would usually establish treatment plants along rivers and streams which are not salty so the processing requires fewer inputs.

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New Agreement Will Advance Desalination Supply System In Chile – Chile

An agreement between UQ’s Sustainable Minerals Institute Centre of Excellence in Chile (SMI-ICE-Chile) and TRENDS Industrial paves the way for collaboration on an integrated multi-user desalination supply system in Chile’s Atacama region.

Chile, and the Atacama Region in particular, is in a severe drought and continued industrial development, especially by the mining industry, will depend on a sustainable water supply.

(LINK).

Desalination loses more urgency in hyper-wet winter – California

Desalination began to lose its urgency among Californians and their public officials two years ago, after the drought-busting winter of 2016-17, when heavy rain and snow ended dry conditions in most of the state.

The idea of drawing potable water from the sea became even less of a priority this year, when an autumn of record-level fires gave way to one of the state’s wettest winters on record.

Reservoirs are brimming. Instead of desperately seeking new sources of water, Californians were moaning about the billions of excess gallons that washed into the Pacific Ocean and the San Francisco Bay. Depleted aquifers began their path to replenishment, too, with snow levels in the water-producing Sierra Nevada Mountains far above normal.

(LINK).

Thomas D. Elias: Desalination loses more urgency in hyper-wet winter – California

Desalination began to lose its urgency among Californians and their public officials two years ago, after the drought-busting winter of 2016-17, when heavy rain and snow ended dry conditions in most of the state.

The idea of drawing potable water from the sea became even less of a priority this year, when an autumn of record-level fires gave way to one of the state’s wettest winters on record.

(LINK).

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