America

BHP to pay $840 million to break from coal in Chile – Chile

BHP’s (ASX, LON, NYSE: BHP) Escondida and Spence copper mines in northern Chile are poised to pay a total of $840 million for an early end to a 2008 energy contract with a coal-fired thermoelectric plant.

The move follows a series of recent steps BHP has been taking to become an environmentally friendly miner, including carbon capture and storage and other innovations such as direct air capture.

Local power company AES Gener — a unit of AES Corp — said on Monday that the agreement signed with its Angamos plant will end in August 2021.

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Poseidon’s Huntington Beach desalination plant still in choppy waters – California

As Poseidon Water pursues the final government approvals needed to build one of the country’s biggest seawater desalination plants.

The company still cannot definitively say who will buy the 50 million gallons a day of drinking water it wants to produce on the Orange County coast.

That’s one of several questions that continue to dog the $1-billion Huntington Beach project as Poseidon tries to seal an iron-clad deal more than two decades after it first proposed the ocean desalter.

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UA developing efficient system to purify waste water – Arizona

Using a grant of $500,000, the team of researchers is developing a solar-powered desalination system that combines several types of technologies to recover water from these concentrated waste streams.

The grant comes from the Department of Energy’s Rapid Advancement in Process Intensification Deployment.

The process uses less energy at a lower cost, and it could provide more water for resource-scarce inland regions such as Arizona.

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Santa Barbara Council Accepts $10 Million Matching Grant to Operate Desalination Plant – California

The Santa Barbara City Council voted 7-0 on Tuesday to accept a $10 million grant — with the understanding that it will run the plant at full capacity for at least 36 out of the next 40 years.

Some environmentalists objected to the council’s decision, citing environmental concerns.

The city was awarded a $10 million matching grant in 2018 from the California Department of Water Resources for the reactivation of the Charles E. Meyer Desalination Plant, 525 E. Yanonali St.

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ECU researchers receive $1.4 million grant to develop desalination system – United States

Converting seawater into clean water will be the focus of a team from East Carolina University, thanks to a grant through the University of North Carolina’s Research Opportunities Initiative.

The $1.4 million grant will go toward the development of a no-waste, sustainable water desalination system. It is the first time that an ECU-led team has received an ROI grant since the program began in 2014-15.

Kura Duba, assistant professor in the Department of Engineering and the principal investigator for the grant, said “It is a very prestigious award and we as a team are very, very grateful and thankful to the UNC System.”

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Infrastructure investments protect community’s water supply – Colorado

Smart investments can help communities weather tough times, so when drought conditions hit the Colorado River Basin in 2000, the Las Vegas Valley Water District (LVVWD) joined local water agencies to invest in forward-thinking plans and programs to protect Southern Nevada’s water supply.

Engineering a deep-water solution, the Southern Nevada Water Authority (SNWA) and its member agencies, including the LVVWD, initiated the engineering design and construction of a 24-foot diameter intake tunnel and Low Lake Level Pumping Station to ensure 2.2 million Southern Nevadans maintained access to their drinking water.

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Creeping salt water forces Cape May City to consider more desalination – New Jersey

Salt water is continuing to creep into private wells and some deep aquifers on the Cape May peninsula, forcing some homeowners to consider other sources of drinking water.

Prompting Cape May City to plan a sharp increase in capacity for a plant that desalinates sea water, state and local officials said.

Although salinity levels in about two dozen “sentinel” wells — those designed to provide an early warning of salt water intrusion — are still below limits set by the state Department of Environmental Protection, coastal communities are being urged to consider their options for ensuring that drinking water supplies are sustainable in the long term.

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Santa Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board Staff Recommends Approval of Permit for Huntington Beach Desal Project – California

HUNTINGTON BEACH, Calif., July 22, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Today, the Santa Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board (“Regional Board”) issued a Staff Report recommending approval of a Tentative Order making amendments to and renewing its operating permit rst issued in 2006 for the proposed Huntington Beach Desalination Project (“Project”).

The Regional Board is scheduled to consider its staff-prepared permit and recommendation beginning on Thursday, July 30, 2020.

The Regional Board staff’s proposed permit amendment and renewal considered all requirements of the California Ocean Plan’s new seawater desalination policy and nds that there is an identied need for the 50 million gallons per day of desalinated water the Huntington Beach Desalination Project will provide.

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Controversial Poseidon desalination plant in Huntington Beach set for hearings this week – California

Poseidon Water’s seawater desalination plant in Huntington Beach, first proposed in 1998, could be getting closer to beginning construction after more than two decades.

The Santa Ana Regional Water Board will hold online hearings this week and decide whether to issue Poseidon a permit.

The hearings begin at 9 a.m. Thursday and are scheduled to continue Friday, as well as Aug. 7 if needed, with a vote scheduled at the end of the hearings. The hearings can be viewed at cal-span.org.

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Governor says Baja used water as a piggy bank. Critics worry about his bigger plan – California

Baja California’s new governor, Jaime Bonilla, says he is battling to clean up widespread corruption that for years ate away at the state’s water agency.

Even Bonilla’s critics acknowledge the corruption and the failing water system, which results in frequent sewage spills that foul Tijuana and San Diego beaches.

But those critics also allege the high-profile investigation, which has already led to 30 criminal complaints, is aimed at Bonilla’s political enemies. And they worry that it could be used to build up his own nest of public funds.

(LINK).

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