Africa

Intro Energy to launch $100mln energy projects in Egypt – Egypt

Intro Energy is planning to launch several projects to produce electricity from renewable resources with investments of $100m within three years.

Mohamed Mamdouh Abbas, the managing director of the company, told Daily News Egypt that Intro Energy will be implementing a solar energy plant with a capacity of 20MW in Sharm El-Sheikh with the net metering system and a solar power plant with a capacity of 10MW in favour of a group of hotels, in addition to a solar plant with a capacity of 5MW for a hotel in Sharm El-Sheikh.

He explained that the net metering system includes installing a digital meter able to calculate the net usage, so that the current coming from the electricity grid and the generated current from the solar power plant can be calculated using a compensation system between production and consumption.

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Infrastructure upgrades improve drinking water in SA’s North West

SA Water has completed water infrastructure upgrades at Watinuma in the state’s remote north west and work have now begun further west in the Murputja region to improve the safety and reliability of drinking water to local communities.

In late 2017, the state-wide utility took on management of water services in an additional three Aboriginal communities in the APY Lands — Kanpi, Nyapari and Watinuma — as well as government facilities at Murputja.

SA Water’s General Manager of Customers, Strategy and Innovation, Anna Jackson, said supplying water to such a vast remote area brings unique challenges, so the teams and contractors working to maintain and upgrade the equipment have had to think outside the box.

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Egypt awards its largest wastewater treatment plant contract to JV – Egypt

Orascom Construction has announced that it has been awarded a $739 million contract to build a water treatment plan in Egypt. Orascom won the contract in a joint venture with Arab Contractors.

The deal was awarded by the Egyptian government through its Armed Forces Engineering Authority. The JV will provide engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) services for the Bahr Albaqar wastewater treatment plant located in the north-western part of the country.

This will be Egypt’s largest wastewater treatment plant with a capacity of 5 million cu m/day and will be used for irrigation purposes. According to Orascom Construction, scope of work also includes operating and maintaining the facility for five years.

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Work to commence on R15bn Amdec Group Harbour Arch precinct – Cape Town

Good news for the Cape Town property market as work is set to commence on major new developments, among them the Amdec Group’s R15bn Harbour Arch precinct.

Early purchasers will be reaping the rewards of buying into Harbour Arch, but there is still value to be had with the second tower launching this year. 

It competes on a global scale in terms of quality and innovation, which means there is a fair expectation of it yielding consistently strong returns on investment.

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Desalination plant ends contract with City of Cape Town, plans to sue – Cape Town

Quality Filtration Systems (QFS), the V&A Waterfront desalination plant owner, has terminated its water supply contract with the City of Cape Town and will pursue legal action. The City was notified of this decision on May 7, GroundUp reports.

“The City is disappointed with this unilateral decision and is now considering the legal ramifications,” the city said in a media statement on May 9.

The R60-million plant has been dormant since February, due to concerns about dirty sea water.

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Egypt retracts on buying water from private sector over high prices – Egypt

The government retracts from buying water from the private sector due to the high prices offered by Arab and international companies.

However, the government decided to limit itself to bidding for desalination plants according to the state strategy.

Informed sources told Daily News Egypt that the bids received by the government to buy a cubic metre of water from desalination plants ranged between EGP 17-20, which are more than double of the prices that the government wants to contract, which is between EGP 5-7.

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CoCT ‘knew water was contaminated’ before awarding desalination plant tender – Cape Town

Cape Town – The company that built the desalination plant at the Waterfront, and is threatening the City of Cape Town with legal action over outstanding payments, said the city knew the water was contaminated before the tender was awarded.

Quality Filtration System (QFS) said they had uncovered information that the city was aware of the same contamination in the seawater in 2017 but neglected to divulge this information during the tender processes.

Herman Smit, managing director of QFS, said: “QFS have, via their legal adviser, formally advised the City that QFS do not believe the city is meeting its legal obligations to comply with the necessary water safety regulations. The city should be conducting routine tests of the local seawater quality and identifying any potential health risks.

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Solar treatment plants promise cleaner water – Kenya

In recent years, much effort has been devoted to creating and developing innovative technologies in the field of solarised water treatment technologies and the future is promising. In Kenya, solar energy is an abundant and a widely untapped resource whose estimated daily insolation is 4-6KWh/m2.

The use of solar energy in photovoltaic (PV) systems for lighting, water heating and solar water pumping is rapidly gaining popularity due to its availability, reliability, efficiency and quick payback periods.

Solar-powered reverse osmosis plants are among the technologies being fronted as the sustainable solution to water scarcity in not just Kenya but the world over and especially at a time when an estimated 2.1 billion people still lack access to safely managed drinking water services, according to a report by WHO and Unicef; with the largest proportion coming from ‘Third World’ countries.

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Morocco set to ensure water supply sustainability – Morocco

Ensuring sustainable supply of drinking water took center stage at a meeting chaired by King Mohammed VI at the Royal palace in Rabat, Thursday, part of an endeavor by the Kingdom to safeguard water resources.

The meeting focused on water supply in the north and the north east, two regions that see their water needs double during the summer, the Royal office said in a statement.

The water needs of the region are also set to increase as the region is home to large-scale industrial investments and tourism development projects.

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Egypt- SCZone pays EGP 1.3bn to army’s Engineering Authority for desalination plant – Egypt

The Engineering Authority of the Armed Forces was paid EGP 1.3bn by the Suez Canal Economic Zone (SCZone) as part of the cost of establishing a seawater desalination plant in the southern area of SCZone.

Mohamed Shaaban, vice president of SCZone, said that the desalination plant has a production capacity of 100,000 cubic metres per day, at a cost of €90m (about EGP 1.76bn).

The southern area’s water needs are estimated at 250,000 cubic metres per day until 2030, and about 120,000 cubic metres per day from 2020 to 2025.

(LINK).

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