Africa

Egypt to build solar power plants in 7 African countries – Egypt

Egypt has announced plans to construct solar plants across seven African countries as part of their commitment to help the continent in its development process and improve the renewable energy performances of those countries.

The Arab Organization for Industrialization (AOI), one of the largest industrial organisations in Egypt, will launch solar power plants in Uganda, Congo, Tanzania, Eritrea, Somalia, and South Sudan, with capacities ranging from 2 to 4 megawatts.

(LINK).

A solar-powered system can turn salt water into fresh drinking water for 25,000 people per day – Kenya

People have been trying to turn seawater into drinking water for thousands of years, but the process is not usually energy-efficient or affordable.

At a newly constructed facility in Kenya, however, a nonprofit called GivePower is tackling that challenge using solar power.

The desalination system, which started operating in the coastal area of Kiunga in July 2018, can create 19,800 gallons (75,000 litres) of fresh drinking water each day – enough for 25,000 people.

(LINK).

Desalination could be an option for KZN, but not in the near future – Durban

Desalination may be considered as an option to supply additional water for the growing population in and around Durban, in KwaZulu-Natal, in the long term, but Umgeni Water is continuing with plans for more traditional water schemes for now.

Umgeni Water planning services manager Kevin Meier this week said the utility had conducted a detailed feasibility study to look at desalination as a bulk water supplier a few years ago.

It considered the viability of two large-scale desalination plants – one on the South Coast just outside Durban, and the other near Tongaat on the North Coast.

(LINK).

City of Cape Town vows to defend contractual dispute over desalination plant – Cape Town

The City of Cape Town Council says it filed an intention to defend a litigation battle with Quality Filtration Systems (QFS) in connection with contractual disputes over its desalination plants.

“It must be understood clearly that the city did not institute court proceedings, it was QFS,” the City of Cape Town Council said.

Mayoral committee member for water and waste services Xanthea Limberg said the city council did not intend to litigate through the media, but it was understood the two parties were in meetings trying to negotiate an out of court settlement. Last month, QFS lodged court papers in the Western Cape High Court.

(LINK).

How 1,500 Nuclear-Powered Water Desalination Plants Could Save The World From Desertification

About 20% of the world’s population has no access to safe drinking water, and this number will increase as the population continues to grow and global freshwater sources continue to decline. The worst-affected areas are the arid and semiarid regions of Asia, the Middle East and North Africa.

UNESCO has reported that the freshwater shortfall worldwide will rise to 500 trillion gallons/yr by 2025. They expect water wars to break out in the near-future. The World Economic Forum says that shortage of fresh water may be the primary global threat in the next decade.

But 500 trillion gallons/year only requires about 1,500 seawater desalination plants like the ones being built in California and Saudi Arabia. At a billion dollars a pop, that’s a lot cheaper than war and starvation.

(LINK).

Egypt’s government mulls establishing joint desalination projects with private sector – Egypt

The government is considering implementing joint desalination projects with the private sector, with a capacity of 150,000 cubic metres per day.

Government sources told Daily News Egypt that various companies have submitted proposals to implement joint water desalination projects, adding that negotiations between the Egyptian government and interested companies to begin next month.

Among these companies are Spanish Aqualia, French Schneider Electric, Swiss AquaSwiss, and Egyptian Metito.

(LINK).

Metito inaugurates desalination plant in Egypt’s Al-Arish worth $96mln – Egypt

Metito is implementing a desalination plant in Al-Arish area with a capacity of 100,000 cubic metres per day in the first phase at a cost of EGP 1.6bn.

“The project is implemented in cooperation with Orascom, and the desalinated water from this plant is sufficient for 750,000 people,” said Kareem Madour, chief executive of Metito.

The project will be completed in 2021 and is part of the overall development plan in Sinai.

(LINK).

Coca-Cola invests millions to ensure SA water security – South Africa

In light of debilitating water shortages throughout South Africa, the Coca-Cola Foundation has pledged to help alleviate this constant issue experienced throughout the country, which has been exacerbated thanks to climate change.

The foundation has invested $1.28 million (approximately R18 million) to help replenish water back into nature. It has done this through the Replenish Africa Initiative (RAIN) and has invested in five projects to remove invasive alien plant species that feed on major cities and towns.

(LINK).

In battle for Libya’s oil, water becomes a casualty – Libya

While Libya’s oil lies at the heart of three months of fighting over Tripoli and years of power struggles before that, water is becoming a far bigger concern for its people.

Interruptions to water supplies are common after eight years of near-anarchy since Muammar Gaddafi was ousted, but a wider crisis is now coming to a head in a country made up mainly of arid desert and split between competing administrations.

In western Libya, finding clean water has become difficult because both the power grid and water control system have been damaged in an offensive by forces loyal to eastern-based Khalifa Haftar on Tripoli, where the U.N.-backed government is based.

(LINK).

Namibia: ‘Desalination Solution to Water Crisis’ – Namibia

Namibia needs at least three desalination plants to address the country’s water shortage, a University of Namibia professor says.

Unam acting pro-vice chancellor for research, innovation and development, professor Frank Kavishe said this at the university’s Sam Nujoma campus at Henties Bay on Tuesday.

The event was also attended by former president Sam Nujoma and Swapo secretary general Sophia Shaningwa.

(LINK).

RSS
Facebook
Facebook
LinkedIn
Instagram