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Jolo named MinDA priority development area – Philippines

THE MINDANAO Development Authority (MinDA) has identified Jolo, the capital of Sulu province, as a priority development area after Taraka town in Lanao del Sur.

“We will come up with a comprehensive proposal and present it to the President,” MinDA Chairperson Emmanuel F. Piñol said in a statement Friday. The development program will be similar to the one recently launched in Taraka, which involves the establishment of model learning centers mainly for agricultural livelihood activities.

Among the key sectors eyed for Jolo are chicken and cattle farming, and solar-power energy for both electricity supply and water desalination. Sulu, a part of the Bangsamoro Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (BARMM), is composed of composed of several islands and has been known as the stronghold of the Abu Sayyaf, a kidnap-for-ranson group that has in recent years allied with the extremist Islamic State.

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Kenya Installs the First Solar Plant That Transforms Ocean Water Into Drinking Water – Kenya

Water should not be luxury product, but still in these modern times, one out of nine people doesn’t have access to clean drinking water.

This main issue here is that only around 4% of earth’s water sources are rivers, lakes and drinkable water, the rest is comprised of oceans with salty water.

These are all alarming statistics, but luckily in many such places around the world things are starting to improve thanks to new technologies.

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Heavy rains are great news for Sydney’s dams, but they come with a big caveat – Australia

Throughout summer, Sydney’s water storage level fell alarmingly. Level 2 water restrictions were imposed and the New South Wales government prepared to double the capacity of its desalination plant.

But then it began to rain, and rain. Sydney water storages jumped from 41% in early February to 75% now – the highest of any capital city in Australia.This is great news for the city, but it comes with a big caveat.

Floodwaters will undoubtedly wash bushfire debris into reservoirs—possibly overwhelming water treatment systems. We must prepare now for that worst-case pollution scenario.

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New solar-powered system makes desalination ecofriendly – America

A completely passive solar-powered desalination system developed by researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and in China could provide more than 1.5 gallons of fresh drinking water per hour for every square metre of solar collecting area. 

Such systems could potentially serve off-grid arid coastal areas to provide an efficient, low-cost water source, said MIT doctoral students in a paper appearing in the journal ‘Energy and Environmental Science’.

The key to the system’s efficiency lies in the way it uses each of the multiple stages to desalinate the water. At each stage, heat released by the previous stage is harnessed instead of wasted. In this way, the team’s demonstration device can achieve an overall efficiency of 385 percent in converting the energy of sunlight into the energy of water evaporation.

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World Bank to invest $117 million in water for the Gaza Strip – Palestine

The World Bank announced on Monday that it will grant US$15 million for a water desalination program for the Gaza Strip.

The new project was founded with the aim of improving the quality and quantity of water in Gaza, and will have additional funds of US$42 million from other donors.

Another US$60 million will be handed over by the Kuwait fund for Arab Economic development.

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Solar-powered desalination systems could bring water to disaster zones – Shanghai

It’s one of life’s most frustrating ironies that Earth’s surface is over 70 percent water, but most of that is undrinkable. Desalination is an important technology that may help unlock more drinking water, and now two independent teams have developed new types of solar-powered desalination systems using very different mechanisms.

The first of the two new designs comes from researchers at MIT and Shanghai Jiao Tong University. The team says the multilayer system has an impressive overall efficiency of 385 percent, producing as much as 5.78 L (1.52 gallons) of clean water per square meter of solar-collecting area, which is more than twice the amount produced by similar systems.

Each of the layers, arranged vertically, has an important role to play in the process. First, there’s a transparent insulating layer that lets sunlight through to a black, heat-absorbing layer. That in turn passes the heat onto several layers of wicking material, which have sucked the water up from below. The water evaporates out of that layer and strikes another surface, where it condenses and drips off to be collected.

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GivePower and Zero Mass Water win awards – Dubai

The US-based companies GivePower foundation and Zero Mass Water won the first and third place, respectively in the Innovative Projects Award – Small Projects category, at the 2nd cycle of the Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Global Water Award.  

Sheikh Ahmed bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Chairman of the Dubai Media Council, has awarded the winners at a special event held in Dubai. 

GivePower Foundation won first place in the Innovative Projects Award – Small Projects category that is worth $120,000. Give Power’s project, Blu Drop Solar Water Farm, is a solar-powered desalination unit that fits into a container. 

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Rain could delay plans to double Sydney’s desal plant capacity – Australia

Warragamba Dam is set to jump above 50 per cent capacity due to heavy rainfall, which means that the implementation of a plan by the NSW government to double the capacity of the Sydney Desalination Plant could be delayed.

Earlier this year, NSW Water Minister Melinda Pavey directed the operators of the plant to prepare for an expansion “as quickly as practicable” in the context of drought and fast-dropping dam levels.

However the $1 billion project will only proceed from the planning to action stages should dam levels hit certain “trigger points”.

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Scientists create simple, solar-powered water desalination – China

A completely passive solar-powered desalination system could provide more than 1.5 gallons of fresh drinking water per hour for every square meter of solar collecting area.

Such systems could potentially serve off-grid arid coastal areas to provide an efficient, low-cost water source.

The system uses multiple layers of flat solar evaporators and condensers, lined up in a vertical array and topped with transparent aerogel insulation.

(LINK).

Simple, solar-powered water desalination – China

A completely passive solar-powered desalination system developed by researchers at MIT and in China could provide more than 1.5 gallons of fresh drinking water per hour for every square meter of solar collecting area. Such systems could potentially serve off-grid arid coastal areas to provide an efficient, low-cost water source.

The system uses multiple layers of flat solar evaporators and condensers, lined up in a vertical array and topped with transparent aerogel insulation. It is described in a paper appearing today in the journal Energy and Environmental Science, authored by MIT doctoral students Lenan Zhang and Lin Zhao, postdoc Zhenyuan Xu, professor of mechanical engineering and department head Evelyn Wang, and eight others at MIT and at Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China.

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