News

Planning starts to enable Kurnell desalination plant to double output – Australia

The state government has begun “preliminary planning” to expand the Kurnell desalination plant as Sydney dam levels continue to drop at record pace.

The plant is producing 250 million litres of water a day at present, but was constructed in such a way that capacity can be scaled up to 500 million litres per day.

Minister for Water, Property and Housing Melinda Pavey said the state was experiencing the worst drought on record and the desalination plant wad playing a significant role in maintaining Sydney’s water supply.

Desalination loses more urgency in hyper-wet winter – California

Desalination began to lose its urgency among Californians and their public officials two years ago, after the drought-busting winter of 2016-17, when heavy rain and snow ended dry conditions in most of the state.

The idea of drawing potable water from the sea became even less of a priority this year, when an autumn of record-level fires gave way to one of the state’s wettest winters on record.

Reservoirs are brimming. Instead of desperately seeking new sources of water, Californians were moaning about the billions of excess gallons that washed into the Pacific Ocean and the San Francisco Bay. Depleted aquifers began their path to replenishment, too, with snow levels in the water-producing Sierra Nevada Mountains far above normal.

(LINK).

Thomas D. Elias: Desalination loses more urgency in hyper-wet winter – California

Desalination began to lose its urgency among Californians and their public officials two years ago, after the drought-busting winter of 2016-17, when heavy rain and snow ended dry conditions in most of the state.

The idea of drawing potable water from the sea became even less of a priority this year, when an autumn of record-level fires gave way to one of the state’s wettest winters on record.

(LINK).

Global Water Crisis: Greece Ranks 26th in the World in Water Scarcity – Greece

Nearly 1.8 billion people, or one-quarter of the Earth’s entire population, live in just seventeen countries which are facing serious water shortages – a problem which is expected to only worsen in the near future.

Of those seventeen nations, which use nearly 80% of their available surface and groundwater in an average year, twelve are in the Middle East and North Africa.

Qatar has the dubious distinction of coming in first place in water shortage issues, with Lebanon and Israel following close behind, according to the Aqueduct Water Risk Atlas report, which was presented by the Water Resources Institute in Washington yesterday.

(LINK).

Saudi Arabia issues request for proposals for Jubail Phase 3 IWPs – Saudi Arabia

Owned by the kingdom’s Ministry of Finance, Saudi Water Partnership Company (SWPC) has issued request for proposals (RFPs) for the development of the Jubail Phase 3 Independent Water Projects (IWP), including Jubail-3A and BB with 600,000m3 and 570,000m3 potable water capacity per day.

SWPC has called for RFPs from 10 pre-qualified bidders including individual companies and consortia.

The qualified bidders for the reverse osmosis desalination plant project include: International Company for Water and Power Projects (Acwa Power); a consortium of FCC Aqualia, Haji Abdullah Alireza & Co and Alfanar Co.; Cobra; Engine Middle East; Malakoff International; a consortium of Marubeni Corporation and Power and Utility Company for Jubail and Yanbu (Marafiq); Mitsubishi Corporation; Suez Groupe; Veolia Middle East; and Utico.

(LINK).

Oil built Saudi Arabia – will a lack of water destroy it? – Saudi

Bottles of water twirl on the conveyor belts of the Berain water factory in Riyadh, as a puddle of water collects on the concrete floor.

In a second warehouse, tanks emit a low hum as water brought in from precious underground aquifers passes through a six-stage purification process before bottling.

“In Saudi Arabia there are only two sources of water: the sea and deep wells,” says Ahmed Safar Al Asmari, who manages one of Berain’s two factories in Riyadh. “We’re in the central region, so there are only deep wells here.”

(LINK).

Day Zero Is Upon Us – Can India’s Water Crisis Be Reversed? – India

The second term of Prime Minister Narendra Modi is the beginning of the most crucial period in the history of India’s water sector. All the alarms raised by experts, media and common citizens are coming to pass.

As city after city moves closer to Day Zero, the land of rivers, lakes, wells and tanks fed by a bounteous monsoon is on the verge of becoming the biggest victim of mindless, non-strategic development exacerbated by climate change.

In the nearly two decades that I have been writing on water issues, not a year went by without ominous reports projecting the running out of groundwater, the overuse of rivers and the degradation of water bodies into receptacles of sewage and filth.

(LINK).

Pics: Jagan visited H2ID Desalination facility in Israel – Israel

The Chief Minister of Andhra Pradesh Y S Jagan Mohan Reddy visited today the H2ID Desalination facility in Hadera, Israel.

The Deputy Chief of Indian Mission in Tel Aviv Sri Tshering accompanied him.

The plant authorities who called on the Chief Minister earlier gave him a brief presentation on the desalination mechanism and the economy/ costs associated with the project.

(LINK).

Egypt to build solar power plants in 7 African countries – Egypt

Egypt has announced plans to construct solar plants across seven African countries as part of their commitment to help the continent in its development process and improve the renewable energy performances of those countries.

The Arab Organization for Industrialization (AOI), one of the largest industrial organisations in Egypt, will launch solar power plants in Uganda, Congo, Tanzania, Eritrea, Somalia, and South Sudan, with capacities ranging from 2 to 4 megawatts.

(LINK).

A solar-powered system can turn salt water into fresh drinking water for 25,000 people per day – Kenya

People have been trying to turn seawater into drinking water for thousands of years, but the process is not usually energy-efficient or affordable.

At a newly constructed facility in Kenya, however, a nonprofit called GivePower is tackling that challenge using solar power.

The desalination system, which started operating in the coastal area of Kiunga in July 2018, can create 19,800 gallons (75,000 litres) of fresh drinking water each day – enough for 25,000 people.

(LINK).

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