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Swansea Water District approves solar agreement – Australia

Swansea Water District Superintendent Jeffrey Sutherland said the $60,000 is about 20 percent of the water district’s electricity costs which is “substantial.”

The Board of Water Commissioners voted last week to approve of a solar agreement that will save the district $60,000 a year in electricity costs.

WASA suffers shortfall of 40M gallons daily – Trinidad

The Water and Sewerage Authority said yesterday, it has suffered a 40 million gallon daily shortfall, as a result of the severe dry season.

WASA said it has started redistribution efforts to help alleviate water shortages across the country.

Chief Executive Officer Allan Poon King said the utility had looked to the use of groundwater wells and collaborations with desalination plants to address some of the shortages.

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Oman pulls quick u-turn on desalination payments – Oman

Oman has moved to reassure private water and power producers that they will still get paid in full, a week after the country’s central offtaker shocked companies by saying it would not be meeting its bills.

At the start of last week, it emerged that the 11 private companies that supply just under 1.5 million m3/d of water in the Sultanate had been told by the Oman Power and Water Procurement Company (OPWP) that there would be a “hold back” of power and water capacity investment payments from April invoices onwards.

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Israel snubs Beijing to give mega desalination project to local firm days after Pompeo warned about Chinese money – Israel

Washington may celebrate a win in its tug-of-war with Beijing after the Israeli government awarded a huge contract, to build a massive facility for making saltwater drinkable, to a local company rather than to a Chinese bidder.

A government panel selected IDE Technologies to build a large desalination plant about 15 km south of Tel Aviv. The Israeli company’s bid was chosen over that of Hutchison Water, a water treatment subsidiary of a Hong Kong-based multinational conglomerate. The win comes less than two weeks after US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo visited Israel and voiced concern about Chinese investment in local infrastructure.

The new facility will be built next to the existing Sorek Desalination Plant and is expected to be commissioned in 2023. Dubbed “Sorek B,” it will produce up to 548,000 cubic meters of fresh water per day. Combined with the first plant’s 624,000 cubic meters-per-day capacity, the site would become one of world’s biggest desalination operations.

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Israel rejects Chinese bid to build Sorek 2 amid pressure from the US – Israel

Israel chose local company IDE technologies to construct the world’s largest desalination plant, the government announced on Tuesday, rather than a Chinese company, thus preventing another undesirable showdown with the Trump administration over Chinese participation in major infrastructure projects.

Three groups bid to build Sorek 2, a private-public partnership (PPP) which will be the world’s largest desalination plant when completed in 2023.

Among them was Israeli Hutchison Company, an affiliate of the Chinese Hutchison Company based in Hong Kong.The US has asked its allies, including Israel, in recent weeks to sever ties with China – Israel’s third-largest trading partner – in areas with security risks, a US official with knowledge of talks on the matter said last week.

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Santa Barbara’s Water Outlook Foresees Sufficient Supply to Meet Demands Through Fall 2022 – California

Santa Barbara’s water supplies are on the way to recovery followed by three average or above-average rainy seasons.

The city’s water-supply forecasting shows there’s sufficient supply to meet demands through fall 2022, while allowing groundwater basins to slowly recover and rest, water supply analyst Dakota Corey told the city’s Water Commission at Thursday’s special meeting.

The availability of water from Gibraltar Reservoir, upstream on the Santa Ynez River, in the past few years as well as Santa Barbara’s desalination plant operation and water conservation have enabled the city to accumulate a significant amount of stored water in Lake Cachuma, Corey said.

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Auckland’s water supply in doubt following dispute over Waikato River water usage

Auckland Council’s Watercare is planning to use the river to meet the next thirty years of Auckland’s population growth, but local iwi and the Waikato Regional Council don’t want that to happen.

It means Auckland may have to look elsewhere for its water supply, and that could be costly.

The once-in-a-generation drought has unveiled some interesting things – like old railway tunnels – and some concerning things – like the tense disagreement over whether Auckland can continue taking water from the Waikato River to supply its growing population.

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SEWA examines 3,000 water samples over last 4 months – Dubai

SHARJAH, 22nd May, 2020 (WAM) — The Sharjah Electricity and Water Authority, SEWA, revealed that the increase in the number of water samples examined in the laboratory of water desalination plants was 3,000 from the beginning of the current year until the end of April 2020.

In the previous year, SEWA examined 8,420 water samples, intending to provide high-quality drinking water, in line with the standards of the World Health Organisation.

Eng. Dr. Rashid Al Leem, Chairman of SEWA, highlighted the fact that the Authority harnessed its technical and operational capabilities to provide high-quality drinking water.

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LETTER: We spent more than R30m on desalination plants, so what has happened to them? – Western Cape

It is reported that the Western Cape’s dams are on average 35.7% full (or empty).

The dams in Cape Town are 53.6% full. Now, is there a panic? Do we need more water at this stage?

Maybe we do. So if we don’t get enough rain soon will we have a serious problem? Well, what do the citizens out there think? My point is, isn’t it exactly for this reason that the CoCT embarked upon the idea of constructing and installing desalination plants? So, if there happen to be very low dams, aren’t the plants supposed to kick in? Are they functioning? Are they ready?

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IIT Madras Develops Low-Cost System To Concentrate Solar Energy – New Delhi

The Indian Institute of Technology Madras, or IIT Madras, has developed a solar ‘parabolic trough collector’ (PTC) system for concentrating solar energy for industrial applications like desalination, space heating and space cooling.

The PTC is lightweight and has been developed to have high energy efficiency. It is designed to function under India’s various climatic and load conditions, said a statement issued by IIT Madras.

The research was led by Prof K Srinivas Reddy, Heat Transfer and Thermal Power Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, IIT Madras and his team member Mr C Ananthsornaraj.

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Thailand to build desalination plant to serve industrial production – Thailand

The Industrial Estate Authority of Thailand (IEAT) is planning to invest in a water desalination plant to supply the Eastern Economic Corridor (EEC) in response to ongoing and future droughts.

The plant, capable of desalinating 300,000 cubic metres of seawater per day, will be set up through a joint venture. It will supply water to factories in the area that has had to reduce water consumption in the past year due to extreme drought.

The EEC covers three provinces – Rayong, Chon Buri and Chachoengsao, with 34 industrial estates and 6,033 factories. It is an ambitious project of the Thai Government to stimulate the local economy.

(LINK).

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