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Chile seawater desalination to grow 156% – Chile

Cochilco analyst Camila Montes said desalination use would grow most in the drier northern parts of the country, forecasting 65% usage in Antofagasta, 60% in Tarapaca, 42% in Atacama and 25% in Coquimbo.

Some 90% of the desalinated seawater will be used in the processing of copper sulphide ores for the production of copper concentrates.

The addition of seawater desalination to a large-scale project adds at least a billion dollars to project capex, up to over $3 billion for a massive plant such as the 2,500 litres per second (lps) plant BHP added at Escondida in 2018.

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EBRD, Egypt discuss developing country’s water desalination sector – Egypt

The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) discusses with the Egyptian government developing the country’s water desalination sector, said Heike Harmgart, Managing Director for the Southern and Eastern Mediterranean (SEMED) region at the Bank.

“We want to potentially prepare a number of desalination plants on a public–private partnership (PPP) basis in the same manner we prepared the 6th of October Dry Port Project which was recently awarded to a large private sector consortium,” Harmgart added.

Interestingly, EBRD’s interest in developing Egypt’s desalination sector is in line with the country’s efforts to face water shortage issues through alternative solutions due to the shaky outcomes of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) negotiations.

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Onee to build new desalination plant in Laâyoune – Morocco

The National Office of Electricity and Drinking Water (Onee) will build a new seawater desalination plant in Laayoune. The plant will strengthen the drinking water supply in the capital of Western Sahara.

A new seawater desalination plant will be built in Laâyoune, the capital of Western Sahara, a territory in North Africa under Moroccan rule. According to Morocco’s National Office of Electricity and Drinking Water (Onee), which is implementing the project, the aim is to strengthen the city’s drinking water supply.To this end, the future plant will have a capacity of 26,000 m³ per day.

The installation will be accompanied by three storage tanks with a cumulative capacity of 5,500 m³. Onee will also build pumping stations to facilitate the delivery of water to households in Laâyoune.

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Woes watered-down – India

CHENNAI: On Tuesday, CE reported that due to the lack of water supply in the tenements at Perumbakkam Resettlement Colony, a group of people including 50 women from the Colony stood outside the Tamil Nadu Slum Clearance Board (TNSCB), staging a protest, demanding basic needs including water. Soon, in response to the call of the residents, the TNSCB officials resumed water supply and told CE that they will ensure no further problem arises.

In line with the perennial water woes at the Resettlement Colony, the Slum Board officials have decided to soon increase the quantum of water being supplied to the tenements. In four months’ time, by when the construction of 14 more blocks will get over, the Slum Board officials said they will request the Metro Water Board to provide more water according to the needs.

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Israel launches tenders for desalination, solar power plants – Israel

The inter-ministerial tenders committees for seawater desalination and solar power plants invited companies to declare their interest in establishing a new desalination facility in the Western Galilee and a large power plant near Dimona on Wednesday.

The publication of pre-qualification tender forms for the construction and operation of the desalination plant, located north of Acre, follows the government’s approval of a strategic plan in June 2018 to cope with the impact of long-term drought.

The plant will be capable of producing at least 100 million cubic meters per year (mcmy) of drinking water.Once construction of the new facility is complete, seven desalination plants across Israel are expected to provide approximately 85% to 90% of national household and municipal potable water needs.

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Australia faces falling inflows even as demand for water grows – Australia

Reservoirs across Australia are recording dwindling inflows as the climate warms and dries, a trend that is likely to continue and force cities, including Melbourne and Sydney, to bolster the security of water supplies.

A new study by University of NSW scientists published in the Water Resources Research journal examined streamflow data for 222 catchments and applied six of the latest climate models. All models forecast drops in supply.

“We are looking at an average of 20 per cent reduced reliability in the future across all the catchments considered,” said Ashish Sharma, a professor at UNSW’s School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and an author of the report.

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Iranian Company Unveils Home-Grown Water Desalination System – Iran

A knowledge-based company in Iran has acquired the knowledge of producing new generation solar desalination systems.

Desalination is a process that removes minerals from saline water and results in freshwater that can be used for human drinking water, irrigation of farms and agricultural and industrial gardens.

Mohsen Nazari, Managing Director of “Arta Javid Asia” knowledge-based company, said that the company is active in the design and construction of advanced desalination systems as well as vacuum engineering that operates in the field of water and new technologies of thermal desalination.

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Fear desalination plans could set back NSW emission goals – Australia

The Berejiklian government is yet to commit to a source of electricity to power the expansion of desalination in the state, potentially locking in a significant new source of greenhouse gas emissions for NSW.

Sydney’s existing $2.3 billion desalination plant is 100 per cent powered by renewable energy as part of a 20-year deal signed in 2008.

Water Minister Melinda Pavey declined to commit to the preferred energy source to run the planned doubling of the plant and two other such facilities including in the Illawarra.

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Dubai adds innovation to destination status – UAE

Over the years, Dubai’s rapid transformation has put it at the forefront of key sectors of the global economy. A strong focus on innovation is now further boosting the city’s economic diversification and in turn enhancing Dubai’s status as an international meetings hub.

Taking its lead from the UAE National Strategy for Advanced Innovation, Dubai is today building a reputation for its knowledge base and the visionary strategies of its leaders, put in place to accelerate innovation across key sectors, including renewable energy, transport, education, health, technology, water and space.

Dubai has been consistently ranked the “Most Innovative City” in the region and the highest-ranking city for deployment of smart city apps — with the highest awareness, usage and satisfaction among its residents. This rapid evolution of innovation and digital transformation has made its way into the city’s infrastructure, bolstering not only the aforementioned verticals, but playing a major role in the business events sector, enhancing the delegate experience and creating lasting legacies.

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Desalination plant evacuated near Kouris river – Cyprus

Disaster was averted last week after the Sovereign Base Area Police and its partners from within the Republic of Cyprus managed to divert the overflowing Kouris river away from the nearby desalination plant, potentially saving lives and averting an environmental issue.

The police were called last Wednesday by the general manager of the plant who reported the water from the overflowing Kouris Dam had caused the river to rise to three metres in some places and was on a direct collision course with the plant.

At the time, the plant contained 17 members of staff and many tonnes of the chemical, chloride, which was now under threat.

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