Monthly Archives: Januar 2020

Why desalination can help quench California’s water needs – California

If you’ve ever created a personal budget, you know that assigning your money to different investment strategies is a crucial component to meet your financial goals.

When you stop dipping into your savings account each month, savings can begin to build.  

Understanding why desalination is so critical to California’s water future is a lot like building a personal budget. With a changing climate, growing population and booming economy, we need to include desalination in the water supply equation to help make up an imported water deficit.

(LINK).

Saudis Plan ‘Solar Dome’ Desalination Plants at Neom Mega-City – Saudi Arabia

Saudi Arabia plans to use a new solar technology to desalinate seawater at Neom, a mega-city that it’s developing along the country’s northern Red Sea coast.

Neom will have the world’s first “solar dome” desalination plants, which it said will produce no carbon emissions and create less brine than facilities using conventional reverse osmosis technology, according to a statement.

The solar dome plants will also process drinking water more cheaply than conventional plants, at 34 cents per cubic meter, Neom said.

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It’s time Melaka’s water problem has a dam solution, says Khoo – Malaysia

A new dam and desalination system are among the solutions being explored to address Melaka’s perennial water woes, says Melaka Smart City Advisory Council chairman Khoo Poay Tiong.

He said the water scarcity in Melaka has been made worse by rapid development and growing urban population as well as climate change.

“Hence, we looking into technology to address the depleting water resources in the state,” he said when interviewed here on Wednesday (Jan 29).

(LINK).

Desalination plants are a critical part of our future – Australia

With water restrictions increasing around NSW and talk about Sydney moving to level three sanctions, people are starting to ask what happens if the city’s water supply becomes critically low?

The prognosis is not good.

Long-term climate forecasts show the drought continuing for a long time. In addition, our population is increasing and recent per capita water usage rates have actually increased.

(LINK).

Chile seawater desalination to grow 156% – Chile

Cochilco analyst Camila Montes said desalination use would grow most in the drier northern parts of the country, forecasting 65% usage in Antofagasta, 60% in Tarapaca, 42% in Atacama and 25% in Coquimbo.

Some 90% of the desalinated seawater will be used in the processing of copper sulphide ores for the production of copper concentrates.

The addition of seawater desalination to a large-scale project adds at least a billion dollars to project capex, up to over $3 billion for a massive plant such as the 2,500 litres per second (lps) plant BHP added at Escondida in 2018.

(LINK).

EBRD, Egypt discuss developing country’s water desalination sector – Egypt

The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) discusses with the Egyptian government developing the country’s water desalination sector, said Heike Harmgart, Managing Director for the Southern and Eastern Mediterranean (SEMED) region at the Bank.

“We want to potentially prepare a number of desalination plants on a public–private partnership (PPP) basis in the same manner we prepared the 6th of October Dry Port Project which was recently awarded to a large private sector consortium,” Harmgart added.

Interestingly, EBRD’s interest in developing Egypt’s desalination sector is in line with the country’s efforts to face water shortage issues through alternative solutions due to the shaky outcomes of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) negotiations.

(LINK).

Onee to build new desalination plant in Laâyoune – Morocco

The National Office of Electricity and Drinking Water (Onee) will build a new seawater desalination plant in Laayoune. The plant will strengthen the drinking water supply in the capital of Western Sahara.

A new seawater desalination plant will be built in Laâyoune, the capital of Western Sahara, a territory in North Africa under Moroccan rule. According to Morocco’s National Office of Electricity and Drinking Water (Onee), which is implementing the project, the aim is to strengthen the city’s drinking water supply.To this end, the future plant will have a capacity of 26,000 m³ per day.

The installation will be accompanied by three storage tanks with a cumulative capacity of 5,500 m³. Onee will also build pumping stations to facilitate the delivery of water to households in Laâyoune.

(LINK).

Woes watered-down – India

CHENNAI: On Tuesday, CE reported that due to the lack of water supply in the tenements at Perumbakkam Resettlement Colony, a group of people including 50 women from the Colony stood outside the Tamil Nadu Slum Clearance Board (TNSCB), staging a protest, demanding basic needs including water. Soon, in response to the call of the residents, the TNSCB officials resumed water supply and told CE that they will ensure no further problem arises.

In line with the perennial water woes at the Resettlement Colony, the Slum Board officials have decided to soon increase the quantum of water being supplied to the tenements. In four months’ time, by when the construction of 14 more blocks will get over, the Slum Board officials said they will request the Metro Water Board to provide more water according to the needs.

(LINK).

Israel launches tenders for desalination, solar power plants – Israel

The inter-ministerial tenders committees for seawater desalination and solar power plants invited companies to declare their interest in establishing a new desalination facility in the Western Galilee and a large power plant near Dimona on Wednesday.

The publication of pre-qualification tender forms for the construction and operation of the desalination plant, located north of Acre, follows the government’s approval of a strategic plan in June 2018 to cope with the impact of long-term drought.

The plant will be capable of producing at least 100 million cubic meters per year (mcmy) of drinking water.Once construction of the new facility is complete, seven desalination plants across Israel are expected to provide approximately 85% to 90% of national household and municipal potable water needs.

(LINK).

Australia faces falling inflows even as demand for water grows – Australia

Reservoirs across Australia are recording dwindling inflows as the climate warms and dries, a trend that is likely to continue and force cities, including Melbourne and Sydney, to bolster the security of water supplies.

A new study by University of NSW scientists published in the Water Resources Research journal examined streamflow data for 222 catchments and applied six of the latest climate models. All models forecast drops in supply.

“We are looking at an average of 20 per cent reduced reliability in the future across all the catchments considered,” said Ashish Sharma, a professor at UNSW’s School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and an author of the report.

(LINK).

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