Monthly Archives: November 2019

South Korea ready to support Egypt’s desalination plans: ambassador – Egypt

South Korea plans to support Egypt’s plans to implement desalination projects, the Korean ambassador to Egypt, Yeocheol Yoon, told Daily News Egypt, asserting, “we hope that Egypt’s negotiations with Ethiopia about the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) will go well, yet water demand in Egypt is still high.”

Desalination is the way to go for Egypt, the ambassador noted, adding that Korean companies have a strong expertise in desalination.

Egypt is working very hard to face water shortage issues through alternative solutions,  President Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi said on 13 October, asserting that Egypt is expanding the implementation of desalination projects with costs worth of EGP 200bn which will increase to EGP 300bn in 2020.

(LINK).

Sydney Water proposes increase in price as drought hits revenue, supply – Sydney

Sydneysiders are using higher than average amounts of water and face the prospect of four more years of restrictions and a hike in bills from next July if the drought does not break.

Sydney Water has submitted a revised submission to the Independent Pricing Regulatory Tribunal (IPART) for a proposal that would see annual water bills rise by $30 a year with dam levels on Tuesday sinking to 46.3 per cent.

The state government is also expected to soon announce the expansion of the desalination plant.

(LINK).

Desalination plant achieves financial closure in UAE – UAE

The $800 million project is funded on a debt to equity ratio of up to 85/15. A syndicate of seven international and local lenders will provide the $680 million senior debt.

The Water Purchase Agreement with off-taker, FEWA, is signed for a 35-year term, and the plant is expected to be commercially operational by July 2022.

According to a company statement, the mandated lead entities including Korea Development Bank, MUFG Bank, Siemens Bank, Standard Chartered Bank, Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation, First Abu Dhabi Bank and Samba Financial Group helped structure the first IWP non-recourse project finance debt for FEWA on a 24.5-year door-to-door tenor.

(LINK).

Financial closure achieved for largest desalination plant in Umm Al Quwain – UAE

United Arab Emirates: A consortium consisting of ACWA Power and MDC Power Holding Company LLC, an entity fully owned by Mubadala Investment Company PJSC (Mubadala) along with the Federal Electricity & Water Authority (FEWA) has achieved the financial closure for the 150 MIGD Umm Al Quwain Independent Water Project (IWP) in the United Arab Emirates.

The $800 million project is funded on a debt to equity ratio of up to 85/15. A syndicate of seven international and local lenders will provide the $680 million senior debt.

The mandated lead entities including Korea Development Bank, MUFG Bank, Siemens Bank, Standard Chartered Bank, Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation, First Abu Dhabi Bank and the Saudi American Bank helped structure the first IWP non-recourse project finance debt for FEWA on a 24.5-year door-to-door tenor.

(LINK).

Mayor to sign drought disaster declaration for Nelson Mandela Bay – South Africa

Nelson Mandela Bay mayor Mongameli Bobani will sign the declaration for the city to maintain its classification as a disaster area within 48 hours.

This was confirmed by mayoral committee member Andile Lungisa during a visit to the Impofu Dam on Thursday, reports HeraldLIVE.

Lungisa was flanked by the metro’s water and sanitation director Barry Martin and the acting executive director of infrastructure and engineering, Zukile Nogongo.

(LINK).

Monterey Bay Desalination Plant Debated by Coastal Commission – California

The Monterey Peninsula is running out of water.

The fog-shrouded, cypress-dotted land formation jutting into the Pacific Ocean forming the southern reach of the Monterey Bay is drying up as underground water aquifers become increasingly depleted.

The lack of water inhibits economic growth, prevents the development of housing – including the affordable variety – and restricts commercial opportunity.

(LINK).

Up the creek: the $85 million plan to desalinate water for drought relief – Australia

The deal to crank up Adelaide’s desalination plant to make more water available to farmers in the drought-stricken Murray-Darling Basin makes no sense.

It involves the federal government paying the South Australian government up to A$100 million to produce more water for Adelaide using the little-used desalination plant.

The plant was commissioned in 2007 at the height of the millennium drought. It can produce up to 100 gigalitres of water a year – enough to fill 40,000 olympic sized swimming pools. But has been used sparingly, operating at its minimum mode of 8 gigalitres a year, because of the expense of turning seawater into freshwater.

(LINK).

PTI to install a desalination plant in Karachi – Pakistan

The members of PTI announced on Wednesday that a desalination water plant will be set up near Karachi’s Sea View. It will provide fresh drinking water to the residents of Defence and Clifton.

It costs more than Rs7 billion, according to party MNA Aftab Siddiqui.

The installation process will begin after two months.

(LINK).

Drag the nation’s water systems into the 21st century, Minister Charles Jr – Jamaica

When Senator Pearnel Charles Jr was assigned the water portfolio I held my breath and waited for good news. He is an attorney by profession, but let’s not hold that against him. I see him as one of the Renaissance men in this Administration, and fully expected him to drag this sorry department scratching and kicking into the 21st century.

Jamaica has an abundance of hydrologic resources. There should be more than enough to meet local demand. The first problem is that it does not always rain where we want it to and when we want it to. Then, like rice, sugar cane and bananas are thirsty plants, and our immigration strategies are woefully inefficient.

We are heavily dependent on ground water, an increasing amount of which is being contaminated by the bauxite-alumina industry. When we hear of deforestation, everybody’s minds run to coal-burning and the clearing of land; nobody talks of the harvesting of yam sticks and its impact on deforestation. But a 2003 study by Barker and Beckford revealed that some 63 million yam sticks are harvested each year. This has a huge impact on the maintenance of forests. The sticks used for fish pots have never been quantified.

(LINK).

UAE company offers to establish $800mln desalination plants in Egypt – Egypt

The Egyptian government has received an offer from an UAE company to implement several desalination plants with investments of up to $800m.

The UAE company has submitted a bid to implement desalination plants in Egypt with a total capacity of 500,000 cubic metres per day, over several phases, Osama Hamdy, Deputy Minister of Housing for follow-up, projects, and utilities, told Daily News Egypt.

He added that a committee has been formed to study the offer. After completing the study, a memorandum will be presented to the Minister of Housing, and then to the cabinet for final decision.

(LINK).

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