Monthly Archives: Juni 2019

Intro Energy to launch $100mln energy projects in Egypt – Egypt

Intro Energy is planning to launch several projects to produce electricity from renewable resources with investments of $100m within three years.

Mohamed Mamdouh Abbas, the managing director of the company, told Daily News Egypt that Intro Energy will be implementing a solar energy plant with a capacity of 20MW in Sharm El-Sheikh with the net metering system and a solar power plant with a capacity of 10MW in favour of a group of hotels, in addition to a solar plant with a capacity of 5MW for a hotel in Sharm El-Sheikh.

He explained that the net metering system includes installing a digital meter able to calculate the net usage, so that the current coming from the electricity grid and the generated current from the solar power plant can be calculated using a compensation system between production and consumption.

(LINK).

Tamil Nadu to approach A.P. for Krishna water – Chennai

The Tamil Nadu government is likely to approach Andhra Pradesh for seeking its share of Krishna water as soon as the latter starts getting heavy inflows in its reservoirs after the southwest monsoon progresses.

The availability of Krishna water has become critical to Chennai, which is in the midst of an acute water shortage. Even though Chennai Metro Water Supply and Sewerage Board is making efforts to tap every conceivable source, this will, at best, sustain the water supply of around 500 million litres a day (MLD).

Without Krishna water, the supply cannot be restored to the normal level of 830 MLD – 850 MLD.

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Running dry: Competing for water on a thirsty planet – India

In India’s ‘Silicon Valley’ tech hub of Bangalore, where gleaming office complexes and apartment blocks have sprouted faster than the plumbing to serve them, only 60% of the water the city needs each day arrives through its water pipes.

Much of the rest is pumped from groundwater wells and delivered to homes and offices by a fleet of private and government tanker trucks that growl through the streets of the city of 12 million.

But Bangalore’s groundwater is running dry. A government think tank last year predicted the city – like others in India, including New Delhi – could run out of usable groundwater as early as 2020 as aquifers deplete.

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Thirsty Singapore taps into innovation to secure its water future – Singapore

Every day after his morning run, Adam Reutens-Tan washes under a half-full camping shower hooked on the ceiling of his bathroom.

The modified shower, which uses just four litres of water, is one of several ways the Reutens-Tans family conserve water as part of a countrywide push to cut Singapore’s daily consumption by 8% by 2030.

The nation currently uses 141 litres per person each day – about enough for two typical eight-minute U.S. showers, according to Harvard University statistics.

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PUB is building one of the world’s largest floating solar panel systems that could generate enough power for 13,500 HDB flats every year – Singapore

Singapore’s Public Utilities Board (PUB) has unveiled an ambitious plan to build the country’s first-ever large-scale floating solar photovoltaic (PV) system by 2021 – and it’s poised to be one of the largest of such structures in the world.

The water agency announced on Thursday (June 6) that the 50 megawatt-peak (MWp) floating solar PV system would be installed at Tengeh Reservoir in two years’ time.

At the opening ceremony of the Ecosperity Conference 2019, minister for the Environment and Water Resources Masagos Zulkifli said that a Request for Proposal will be launched on Friday (June 7) to invite private sector companies to take over the design, construction, ownership and operations of the Tengeh instalment for the next 25 years.

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Infrastructure upgrades improve drinking water in SA’s North West

SA Water has completed water infrastructure upgrades at Watinuma in the state’s remote north west and work have now begun further west in the Murputja region to improve the safety and reliability of drinking water to local communities.

In late 2017, the state-wide utility took on management of water services in an additional three Aboriginal communities in the APY Lands — Kanpi, Nyapari and Watinuma — as well as government facilities at Murputja.

SA Water’s General Manager of Customers, Strategy and Innovation, Anna Jackson, said supplying water to such a vast remote area brings unique challenges, so the teams and contractors working to maintain and upgrade the equipment have had to think outside the box.

(LINK).

Massive Artificial Islands Could Extract CO2 From Seawater To Produce Renewable Energy, Study Says

A group of European scientists wants to mitigate the effects of climate change and advance renewable energy sources by building millions of artificial islands throughout the world’s oceans capable of converting atmospheric carbon dioxide into fuel.

Publishing their work in PNAS, the researchers highlight the challenges in meeting such an “ambitious proposal” but argue that the technology to build the infrastructure already exists. However, a fully implementable and realistic plan simply hasn’t yet been proposed.

“Humankind must cease CO2 emissions from fossil fuel burning if dangerous climate change is to be avoided,” wrote the authors, adding that liquid carbon-based energy carriers such as these often lack practical alternatives for application.

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Two Agencies Want to Secede From the San Diego County Water Authority

Water rates in San Diego are some of the highest in the country. So, two rural San Diego water agencies just came up with a novel way to save money: Buy water from Riverside County instead.

Leaders of two water agencies that serve about 50,000 people in and around Fallbrook are fed up with rising costs at the San Diego County Water Authority.

Local water agencies from across the region formed the Water Authority in 1944 to import water into the county from rivers hundreds of miles away. But, just in time for the Water Authority’s 75th anniversary, its future as the region’s main water supplier is in question.

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Renewables to preclude need for new gas-based power projects in Oman – Oman

Going by expected power demand growth trends, any demand for new generation capacity will be met almost exclusively by renewables over the next seven years, precluding the need for any new gas-based Independent Power Projects (IPPs) during this timeframe.

This paradigm shift in Omans power generation space underscores the ambitious role envisaged for renewables chiefly solar photovoltaic capacity in the nations energy mix, according to an official of Oman Power and Water Procurement Company (OPWP), the sole procurer of electricity generation and related water desalination capacity under the sector law.

More than 11 per cent of power supply will come from renewable energy by 2023, rising to between 25-30 per cent by 2030, said Bushra al Maskari, Planning Director OPWP. Even globally, moving from zero per cent to 30 per cent in less than a decade is astounding, she remarked in a presentation on energy trends at a forum held in the city recently.

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Dewa appoints consultancies for Hassyan Desalination IWP Project – UAE

The Dubai Electricity and Water Authority (Dewa) has appointed a consortium of companies including Ernst & Young (E & Y), CMS, and WSP as advisors on the Hassyan’s Sea Water Reverse Osmosis (SWRO) Project to produce 120 million imperial gallons per day.

The project is Dewa’s first Independent Water Producer model (IWP) project. Dewa adopted the IWP system for the Hassyan desalination plant following the success of the Independent Power Producer model at the Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Solar Park projects.

The SWRO project is expected to commence production in 2023. The desalination plant will use the most efficient and proven art technology available at the mark. The plant will supply the Dewa water transmission network to ensure sustainable supply.

(LINK).

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