Monthly Archives: April 2019

Dubai’s M-Station extension project with capacity of 2.8GW and 140MIPD – Dubai

The M-Station extension project in Jebel Ali, the largest power and water desalination plant in the UAE, has been inaugurated.

The Dh1.527bn extension project added new generating units with a capacity of 700MW.

The project brings the total production capacity of the plant to 2,885 megawatts (MW) and 140 million gallons of desalinated water per day with the total cost of M-station reaching Dh11.669bn.

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Why Saudi Aramco sees shale gas as next energy bonanza – Saudi Arabia

The world’s biggest oil exporter is ramping up efforts to develop natural gas with plans for a 15-fold boost in output from unconventional deposits of the fuel.

Saudi Aramco is building facilities to tap shale gas in the kingdom’s oil-rich eastern region and is making “a lot of progress” toward this goal, CEO Amin Nasser told reporters in Dammam, Saudi Arabia. Plans include a plant to desalinate seawater that Aramco can then inject underground to frack for gas.

“We are looking to take our unconventional gas within the next 10 years to 3 billion standard cubic feet a day of sales gas,” Nasser said on Sunday.

Aramco currently produces more than 190 million cubic feet of unconventional gas daily, all of it in the remote north.

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CoCT ‘knew water was contaminated’ before awarding desalination plant tender – Cape Town

Cape Town – The company that built the desalination plant at the Waterfront, and is threatening the City of Cape Town with legal action over outstanding payments, said the city knew the water was contaminated before the tender was awarded.

Quality Filtration System (QFS) said they had uncovered information that the city was aware of the same contamination in the seawater in 2017 but neglected to divulge this information during the tender processes.

Herman Smit, managing director of QFS, said: “QFS have, via their legal adviser, formally advised the City that QFS do not believe the city is meeting its legal obligations to comply with the necessary water safety regulations. The city should be conducting routine tests of the local seawater quality and identifying any potential health risks.

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Kuwait, South Korea trade volume totals USD 14 billion in 2018

The trade volume between Kuwait and South Korea has totaled USD 14 billion in 2018, up by 33 percent, compared to 2017’s, which was divided between USD 12.7 billion as Kuwaiti exports and USD 1.3 billion as South Korean imports.

Kuwaiti exports of crude oil and its derivatives enjoyed the lion’s share of trade exchange with South Korea, especially since the GCC-member state is Seoul’s second-largest energy supplier after Saudi Arabia, said South Korean Embassy in Kuwait on Saturday.

Meanwhile, South Korean Prime Minister Lee Nak-yeon is scheduled to make a four-day official visit to Kuwait on April 30, during which he will meet top officials.

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Cal Am desal plant gets narrow Planning Commission OK – California

Citing long-running efforts to secure a new Monterey Peninsula water supply and the state-imposed deadline for reducing unauthorized water usage, the county Planning Commission approved California American Water’s desalination plant north of Marina on Wednesday.

By a 6-4 vote, the commission backed a use permit for the proposed 6.4 million gallon per day desal plant. The plant is designed to provide about 40 percent of the Peninsula’s planned new water supply to offset the state’s Carmel River pumping cutback order set to take full effect at the end of 2021, as well as reduce pumping from the Seaside basin. The commission’s approval can be appealed to the Board of Supervisors.

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Santa Barbara Close to 2020 Renewable Energy Goal – California

With eight months left until the end of the year, the City of Santa Barbara is 8 percent shy of its goal to have half the power used by its municipal buildings come from renewable energy sources by 2020.

Since the Santa Barbara City Council committed to the goal in 2017, the city started installing three small scale solar arrays, two at fire stations and the last at the Eastside Branch Library, which began going up only this past week, said Alelia Parenteau, Energy Program supervisor at city Public Works.

More solar arrays are being designed for the Santa Barbara airport and Granada Garage.

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Israel startup aims to save the planet from thirst using algae – Israel

Imagine if showering was a luxury, washing your floors a dirty secret, and shampooing the dog was illegal. It isn’t unthinkable that within our lifetimes, bath will be a dirty word as the world grows ever shorter of water — to drink, to wash and crucially, to irrigate crops.

Enter the Israeli startup Aqwind, which has taken the lowest life-forms in the world, bacteria and algae, and harnessed them to a low-cost way to clean dirty water enough for irrigation.

Manure is great as fertilizer, but irrigating with raw human sewage will just produce fruit & veg chock full of goodness, and intestinal bacteria, parasites, and viruses.

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Gaza’s energy pioneer keeps Palestinian lights on with affordable solar – Gaza

Having no extra money to take a taxi or ride a bus has never stopped Samar from getting her child to the hospital – it was a matter of keeping her son alive.

Walking under Gaza’s blaring sun or having to contend with stormy weather was just what she had to do. 

Because of a lung condition, Samar’s son, aged nine, had to undergo daily oxygen treatments. Doing them at home was risky, as the electricity was too unreliable to trust it with a matter of life and death. 

Then Majd Mashharawi, a Palestinian energy entrepreneur, installed a prototype of the solar power system she has pioneered into Qahman’s home.

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Solar treatment plants promise cleaner water – Kenya

In recent years, much effort has been devoted to creating and developing innovative technologies in the field of solarised water treatment technologies and the future is promising. In Kenya, solar energy is an abundant and a widely untapped resource whose estimated daily insolation is 4-6KWh/m2.

The use of solar energy in photovoltaic (PV) systems for lighting, water heating and solar water pumping is rapidly gaining popularity due to its availability, reliability, efficiency and quick payback periods.

Solar-powered reverse osmosis plants are among the technologies being fronted as the sustainable solution to water scarcity in not just Kenya but the world over and especially at a time when an estimated 2.1 billion people still lack access to safely managed drinking water services, according to a report by WHO and Unicef; with the largest proportion coming from ‘Third World’ countries.

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Cal Am desal plant project goes to Monterey County Planning Commission – California

Considered by many the key to long-running efforts to cut unauthorized pumping from the Carmel River, California American Water’s proposed desalination plant project is headed to the Monterey County Planning Commission next week.

On Wednesday, the commission is set to conduct a public hearing on a combined development permit for the proposed 6.4-million-gallon-per-day desal plant on Charlie Benson Road off Del Monte Boulevard north of Marina.

The commission is charged with considering a use permit and administrative permit and design approval, for the desal plant and related facilities based on consideration of a combined environmental impact report and environmental impact statement certified by the California Public Utilities Commission in September.

(LINK).

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